Medieval Westminster 1200-1540

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

byGervase Rosser

not yet rated|write a review
As a royal capital, Westminster was unique: a small town, characterized by a complex economy and society, but lacking legal incorporation. Gervase Rosser examines the nature of the urban community. Given social diversity and competing interests, what forces existed to contain tensions andensure continuity? The regular expressions of shared interests and common identity - in local government, parochial life, and the activities of guilds - are perceived to be essential to the survival of the town. Gervase Rosser's argument has implications not only for the history of the small town,but for the history of urbanization throughout the medieval and early modern period.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$235.51 online
$315.00 list price (save 25%)
Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

As a royal capital, Westminster was unique: a small town, characterized by a complex economy and society, but lacking legal incorporation. Gervase Rosser examines the nature of the urban community. Given social diversity and competing interests, what forces existed to contain tensions andensure continuity? The regular expressions of...

Gervase Rosser is at St. Catherine's College, Oxford.

other books by Gervase Rosser

Spectacular Miracles: Transforming Images in Italy from the Renaissance to the Present
Spectacular Miracles: Transforming Images in Italy from...

Kobo ebook|Jun 15 2013

$55.59 online$72.18list price(save 22%)
The Medieval Town in England 1200-1540
The Medieval Town in England 1200-1540

Kobo ebook|Jun 23 2014

$99.67

Format:HardcoverDimensions:442 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.22 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198201567

ISBN - 13:9780198201564

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Medieval Westminster 1200-1540

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

'It is unlikely that we shall have a more elegantly written contribution to the debate ... strong, clear and provocative views of a "younger generation".'Robert Tittler, Concordia University, Montreal, Journal of British Studies