Medievalism, Multilingualism, and Chaucer

Hardcover | December 15, 2009

byMary Catherine Davidson

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Medievalism, Multilingualism, and Chaucer examines multilingual identity in the writing of Gower, Langland, and Chaucer. Mary Catherine Davidson traces monolingual habits of inquiry to nineteenth-century attitudes toward French, which had first influenced popular constructions of medieval English in such historical novels as Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe. In re-reading medieval traditions in the origins of English from Geoffrey of Monmouth, this book describes how multilingual practices reflected attitudes toward English in the age of Chaucer.

 

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Medievalism, Multilingualism, and Chaucer examines multilingual identity in the writing of Gower, Langland, and Chaucer. Mary Catherine Davidson traces monolingual habits of inquiry to nineteenth-century attitudes toward French, which had first influenced popular constructions of medieval English in such historical novels as Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe. In re-reading medieval traditions in the origins...

Mary Catherine Davidson is an associate professor of English at Glendon College, York University.

other books by Mary Catherine Davidson

The Languages of Nation
The Languages of Nation

Kobo ebook|Jul 25 2012

$29.79 online$35.00list price(save 14%)
Format:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 8.39 × 5.67 × 0.66 inPublished:December 15, 2009Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230602975

ISBN - 13:9780230602977

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Table of Contents

Introduction:  Monolingualism and Middle English * Traditions of Contact and Conflict in the History of English * Medievalism and Monolingualism * Hengist’s Tongue: A Medieval History of Middle English * “And in Latyn . . . a wordes fewe”: Contact and Medieval Conformity * Multilingual Writing and William Langland * Chaucer’s “Diversite” * Afterword: Postcolonialism and Chaucer’s English