Mediterranean Encounters: Artists Between Europe and the Ottoman Empire, 1774-1839 by Elisabeth A. FraserMediterranean Encounters: Artists Between Europe and the Ottoman Empire, 1774-1839 by Elisabeth A. Fraser

Mediterranean Encounters: Artists Between Europe and the Ottoman Empire, 1774-1839

byElisabeth A. Fraser

Hardcover | January 24, 2017

Pricing and Purchase Info

$124.20 online 
$131.95 list price save 5%
Earn 621 plum® points

Ships within 1-2 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

In this volume, Elisabeth Fraser shows that artists and the works they created in the Mediterranean during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries were informed by mutual dependence and reciprocity between European nations and the Ottoman Empire. Her rich exploration of this vibrant cross-cultural exchange challenges the dominant interpretation of European relations with the East during the period, revealing a shared world of fluid and long-sustained interactions.

Voyagers to and from the Ottoman Empire documented their journeys in prints, paintings, and lavishly illustrated travelogues; many of these helped define Europe’s self-identified role as heir to Ottoman civilizations and bolstered its presence in the Islamic Mediterranean and beyond. Fraser finds that these works illuminate not only how travelers’ experiences abroad were more nuanced than the expansionist ideology with which they became associated, but also how these narratives depicted the vitality of Ottoman culture and served as extensions of Ottoman diplomacy. Ottomans were aware of and responded to European representations, using them to defend Ottoman culture and sovereignty. In embracing the art of both cultures and setting these works in a broader context, Fraser challenges the dominant historiographical tradition that sees Ottoman artists adopting European modes of art in a one-sided process of “Europeanization.”

Theoretically informed and rigorously researched, this cross-cultural approach to European and Ottoman art sheds much-needed critical light on the widely disseminated travel images of the era—important cultural artifacts in their own right—and provides a fresh and inviting understanding of the relationships among cultures in the Mediterranean during an era of increasing European expansionism.

Elisabeth A. Fraser is Professor of Art History at the University of South Florida and the author of Delacroix, Art, and Patrimony in Post-Revolutionary France. Elisabeth A. Fraser is Professor of Art History at the University of South Florida and the author of Delacroix, Art, and Patrimony in Post-Revolutionary France.
Title:Mediterranean Encounters: Artists Between Europe and the Ottoman Empire, 1774-1839Format:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 10 × 9 × 1 inPublished:January 24, 2017Publisher:Penn State University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0271073209

ISBN - 13:9780271073200

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Mediterranean Encounters: Artists Between Europe and the Ottoman Empire, 1774-1839

Reviews

Table of Contents

Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Interpreting Travel in the Ottoman Mediterranean

Part I: Power in Question

Chapter 1 Reading Choiseul in the Gaps of the Orientalist Archive

Chapter 2 In the Shadow of les Grands: Cassas’s Orientalist Self-Fashioning

Part II: Ottoman Culture Abroad

Chapter 3 The Translator’s Art: Mouradgea d’Ohsson, Ottoman Dragoman in Paris

Chapter 4 Miniatures in Black and White: Melling’s Istanbul

Part III: Contradictory Contact

Chapter 5 Skin of Nation, Body of Empire: Louis Dupré in Ottoman Greece

Chapter 6 A Painter’s Renunciation: Delacroix in North Africa

Postscript

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Editorial Reviews

“This book obviously speaks to scholars of art history and imperial history and to students of books and printing, yet the complex tapestries unraveled and rewoven in each chapter speak as well to questions of national identity, anti-imperialism, artistic autonomy, and originality and borrowing. Fraser’s careful and systematic analyses of illustrations and texts in multiple contexts across disciplinary debates should not only speak to specialists but also interest and teach others for whom these travel books may be an introduction to the borderlands and crossings of Mediterranean empires to records one can still read—after centuries of distance—as lessons in global exchange. Summing up: Essential.”—G. W. McDonogh, Choice