Melinda Camber Porter In Conversation With Octavio Paz, Cuernavaca, Mexico 1983: ISSN Vol 1, No. 4 Melinda Camber Porter Archive of Creative Works by Octavio PazMelinda Camber Porter In Conversation With Octavio Paz, Cuernavaca, Mexico 1983: ISSN Vol 1, No. 4 Melinda Camber Porter Archive of Creative Works by Octavio Paz

Melinda Camber Porter In Conversation With Octavio Paz, Cuernavaca, Mexico 1983: ISSN Vol 1, No. 4…

byOctavio PazEditorJoseph R. Flicek

Hardcover | March 19, 2017

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Melinda Camber Porter's conversation with Octavio Paz took place in August 1983 at his home in Cuernavaca, Mexico. Camber Porter traveled to Mexico to write an article on the John Huston filming of Under the Volcano (novel by Malcolm Lowery) for The Times (London). She took this opportunity to also interview Octavio Paz. Their wide-ranging conversation included the subjects of comparative art, literature, poetry and politics in Mexico, Latin America, Europe and America, as well as Paz's reflections on writer's block. This conversation took place at the same time as the publication of the English language edition of Octavio Paz's book, Marcel Duchamp. Dr. Laura Vidler, Chair of Spanish at the University of South Dakota, writes in her foreword, "if you think you've read this interview before [in the Partisan Review in 1986] you haven't." As the Partisan Review redacted much of the content. "In this new volume, however, the interview is published in its entirety, and the results are wonderful. Empathy between Paz and Camber Porter is established quickly. A professional diplomat, Paz's dual life as cultural ambassador and writer parallels Camber Porter's. Conversation about Duchamp, Picasso, Camus and Matisse-previously cut-appears here, as well as discussion of the classical Spanish poets that made up Paz's early reading-Quevedo, Góngora, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (the subject of Paz's book, Las trampas de la Fe). In addition to a complete transcription of the interview, this volume includes Paz's Nobel speech in both English and (the original) Spanish, as well as further information on the work of Melinda Camber Porter." explains Vidler. In the second foreword, Scott Chaskey, a poet and farmer-naturalist from Sag Harbor, New York, provides his personal inspirations received from Octavio Paz. "For forty years I have returned to this beautiful evocation by Octavio Paz from The Bow and the Lyre," explains Chaskey. He writes on, "The interview you are about to read, conducted in 1983, eight years before Paz was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, is the record of a conversation that takes place between two spirited and original poets, the Mexican master at age 69, and the young and curious British writer/artist, aged 30. Melinda Camber Porter begins with a plan, as a journalist is trained to do, but immediately following their introduction conversation begins to spin and is enlivened through a shared poetic sensibility. Melinda is interested in Octavio's cosmology-at first he retreats: "That's a big question, cosmology..." he replies, but throughout the course of the interview she sort of coaxes some of this out of him, artist to artist. They discuss history, psychology, the creative process, politics, eroticism, the accuracy of Milton's Hell, and they comment on an eclectic mix of writers-Whitman, William Blake, Camus, Shelley, Baudelaire, Eliot, Thoreau, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz-though again and again the conversation returns to the poetic." In addition to Melinda Camber Porter's interview with Octavio Paz in 1983, this published edition includes Octavio Paz' 1991 Nobel Prize in Literature lecture in the original Spanish and an English translation. Melinda Camber Porter Archive of Creative Works Volume I: Journalism and Volume II: Art and Literature ISSN: 2379-2450 (Print), 2379-3198 (Ebook), 2379-321X (Audio) Website: www.MelindaCamberPorter.com Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melinda_Camber_Porter YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIflCaF2qpHh8uQgffSXLDQ

Octavio Paz was a Mexican writer, poet and diplomat. He won the 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature. He is considered one of the most influential writers and poets of the 20th Century. A prolific author and poet, Paz published scores of works during his lifetime. His later poetry dealt with love and eroticism, the nature of time, and Buddhi...
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Title:Melinda Camber Porter In Conversation With Octavio Paz, Cuernavaca, Mexico 1983: ISSN Vol 1, No. 4…Format:HardcoverDimensions:140 pages, 11 × 8.5 × 0.5 inPublished:March 19, 2017Publisher:Blake PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1942231075

ISBN - 13:9781942231073

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Table of Contents

Table of ContentsFigure IllustrationsForeword by Laura L. VidlerInvitation to the Journey foreword by Scott ChaskeyInstead of Mexico by James MichenerReview by Melinda Camber PorterMelinda Camber Porter In Conversation With Octavio PazOctavio Paz 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature LectureEnglish TranslationSpanish TranslationBiography of Octavio PazThe Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveAbout ArtLiteratureFilmJournalismPraiseMore InformationIndexMelinda Camber Porter Archive Catalog ListingList of FiguresFig. 1Inside front cover of Marcel Duchamp by Octavio PazEnglish language translationViking Penguin, Inc. 1978Collection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 2Octavio Paz in Malmö, Sweden, 1985Photo: Jonn LeffmannFig. 3Edited transcript of Melinda's conversation with Octa¬vio PazCollection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 4Melinda Camber Porter, 1983Collection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchivePhoto: Joyce BaroneoFig. 5Edited transcript of Melinda's conversation with Octa¬vio PazCollection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 6Original tape used by Melinda Camber Porter to record the first segment of her conversation with Octavio PazCollection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 7Octavio Paz in Mazatlan, 1985Photo: unknownFig. 8Original tape used by Melinda Camber Porter to record the second segment of her conversation with Octavio PazCollection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 9Edited transcript of Melinda's conversation with Octa¬vio PazCollection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 10Octavio Paz, 1978Photo: Sara Facio Fig. 11Edited transcript of Melinda's conversation with Octa¬vio PazCollection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 12Inscription in Melinda Camber Porter's copy of Marcel Duchamp by Octavio Paz (1978)Inscription: When does cultural exchange become imperialism and become merely an assimilated tradition. How does this work in Latin America? [indecipherable] French influence.Collection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 13Original tape used by Melinda Camber Porter to record the second segment of her conversation with Octavio PazCollection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 14Inscription in Melinda Camber Porter's copy of Marcel Duchamp by Octavio Paz (1978)Inscription: P. 143: apparition v. appearancedistortion-link to madness (also voyeurism)The poer of the ego-SartreP. 150 synesthesia v. the sign of accordanceCollection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 15Edited transcript of Melinda's conversation with Octa¬vio PazCollection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchiveFig. 16Octavio Paz in Malmö, Sweden, 1985Photo: Jonn LeffmannFig. 17Melinda Camber Porter, 1983Collection of the Melinda Camber Porter ArchivePhoto: Joyce Baroneo

Editorial Reviews

Dr. Laura Vidler, Chair of Spanish at the University of South Dakota, writes in her foreword, "if you think you've read this interview before [in the Partisan Review in 1986] you haven't." As the Partisan Review redacted much of the content. Dr. Vidler continues, "In this new volume, however, the interview is published in its entirety, and the results are wonderful. Empathy between Paz and Camber Porter is established quickly. A professional diplomat, Paz's dual life as cultural ambassador and writer parallels Camber Porter's. Conversation about Duchamp, Picasso, Camus and Matisse- previously cut-appears here, as well as discussion of the classical Spanish poets that made-up Paz's early reading-Quevedo, Góngora, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (the subject of Paz's book, Las trampas de la Fe)."In the second foreword, Scott Chaskey, a poet and farmer-naturalist from Sag Harbor, New York, provides his personal inspirations received from Octavio Paz. "For forty years, I have returned to this beautiful evocation by Octavio Paz from The Bow and the Lyre. The interview you are about to read, conducted in 1983, eight years before Paz was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, is the record of a conversation between two spirited and original poets, the Mexican master at age 69, and the young and curious British writer/artist, aged 30. Melinda Camber Porter begins with a plan, as a journalist is trained to do, but immediately following their introduction, conversation begins to spin and is enlivened through a shared poetic sensibility. Melinda is interested in Octavio's cosmology-at first he retreats: "That's a big question, cosmology..." he replies, but throughout the course of the interview she coaxes this out of him, artist to artist."