Melvilles City: Literary and Urban Form in Nineteenth-Century New York by Wyn KelleyMelvilles City: Literary and Urban Form in Nineteenth-Century New York by Wyn Kelley

Melvilles City: Literary and Urban Form in Nineteenth-Century New York

byWyn Kelley

Paperback | April 2, 2009

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Melville's City argues that Melville's relationship to the city is considerably more complex than has generally been believed. By placing him in the historical and cultural context of nineteenth-century New York, Kelley presents a Melville who borrows from the colorful cultural variety of the city while at the same time investigating its darker and more dangerous social aspects. Through examination of works spanning Melville's career, she forges a new analysis of the connections between urban and literary form.
Title:Melvilles City: Literary and Urban Form in Nineteenth-Century New YorkFormat:PaperbackDimensions:332 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.75 inPublished:April 2, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521106729

ISBN - 13:9780521106726

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Proud City, Proudest Town; Part I. Travelling the Town: 1. Urban space; 2. Spectator in the capital; 3. Provincial in a labyrinth; Part II. Escaping the City: 4. Town ho; 5. Sojourner in the city of man; 6. Pilgrim in the city of God; Conclusion: Citified man; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Ultimately, Kelley's text is an astute analysis of an important field of Melville scholarship. It is clearly a well-researched book--Kelley has studied (and apllied) Melville criticism in great depth. One comes away from Melville's City with a good sense of Melville's complex relationship with New York....Kelley's work highlights the oftentimes glossed-over relationship Melville had with that vast world away from the sea--the city." American Studies International