Memory and Forgetting in English Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Webster by Garrett A. SullivanMemory and Forgetting in English Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Webster by Garrett A. Sullivan

Memory and Forgetting in English Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Webster

byGarrett A. Sullivan

Paperback | July 30, 2009

Pricing and Purchase Info

$41.16

Earn 206 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Examining sixteenth and seventeenth century conceptions of memory and forgetting, this study demonstrates their importance to the drama and culture of the time. Garrett A. Sullivan discusses memory and forgetting in terms of which a variety of behaviors--from seeking salvation to pursuing vengeance to succumbing to desire--are conceptualized. Focusing on works such as Macbeth, Hamlet, Dr. Faustus and The Duchess of Malfi, he reveals memory and forgetting to be dynamic cultural forces central to early modern understandings of embodiment, selfhood and social practice.
Title:Memory and Forgetting in English Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare, Marlowe, WebsterFormat:PaperbackDimensions:196 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.43 inPublished:July 30, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521117356

ISBN - 13:9780521117357

Reviews

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Introduction: planting oblivion; 1. Embodying oblivion; 2. 'Be this sweet Helen's knell, and now forget her': forgetting and desire in All's Well That Ends Well; 3. 'If he can remember': spiritual self-forgetting in Doctor Faustus; 4. 'My oblivion is a very Antony'; 5. Sleep, conscience and fame in The Duchess of Malfi; Coda: 'wrought with things forgotten'; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Sullivan is a splendid close reader, with an intelligent fastidiousness so admirably capable of sustaining an argument that the book is a lively read throughout and wholly recommended." --Andrew Scott, Buffalo State University: Renaissance Quarterly Review