Metaphor and Writing: Figurative Thought in the Discourse of Written Communication by Philip EubanksMetaphor and Writing: Figurative Thought in the Discourse of Written Communication by Philip Eubanks

Metaphor and Writing: Figurative Thought in the Discourse of Written Communication

byPhilip Eubanks

Hardcover | December 6, 2010

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This volume explains how metaphors, metonymies, and other figures of thought interact cognitively and rhetorically to tell us what writing is and what it should do. Drawing on interviews with writing professionals and published commentary about writing, it argues that our everyday metaphors and metonymies for writing are part of a figurative rhetoric of writing - a pattern of discourse and thought that includes ways we categorize writers and writing; stories we tell about people who write; conceptual metaphors and metonymies used both to describe and to guide writing; and familiar, yet surprisingly adaptable, conceptual blends used routinely for imagining writing situations. The book will give scholars a fresh understanding of concepts such as 'voice', 'self', 'clarity', 'power', and the most basic figure of all: 'the writer'.
Title:Metaphor and Writing: Figurative Thought in the Discourse of Written CommunicationFormat:HardcoverProduct dimensions:224 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.59 inShipping dimensions:8.5 × 5.43 × 0.59 inPublished:December 6, 2010Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521191025

ISBN - 13:9780521191029

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Table of Contents

1. In search of the figurative rhetoric of writing; 2. The double-bind of writer and to write: graded categories; 3. Bind upon bind: the general-ability and specific-expertise views of writing; 4. Three licensing stories: the literate inscriber, the good writer, and the author; 5. Writing as transcription, talk, and voice: a complex metonymy; 6. The writing self: multiple selves, conceptual blends; 7. Writing to 'get ideas across': the role of the conduit metaphor; 8. Codes and conversations: the other conduit metaphor; 9. Metaphor and choice.