Metaphysical Personalism: An Analysis of Austin Farrers Metaphysics of Theism

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

byCharles Conti

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How can we, or should we, talk about God? What concepts are involved in the idea of a Supreme Being? This book is about the search to reconcile modern metaphysics with traditional theism - focusing on the seminal work of Austin Farrer who was Warden of Keble College, Oxford, until his death in1968, and one of the most original and important philosophers of religion of this century.

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How can we, or should we, talk about God? What concepts are involved in the idea of a Supreme Being? This book is about the search to reconcile modern metaphysics with traditional theism - focusing on the seminal work of Austin Farrer who was Warden of Keble College, Oxford, until his death in1968, and one of the most original and impo...

From the Jacket

How can we or should we talk about God? What concepts are involved in the idea of a Supreme Being? This book is about the search for an adequate modern metaphysics to support theism. It focuses on the work of one of the most outstanding philosophers of religion of this century, Austin Farrer. Warden of Keble College, Oxford, until his ...

Charles Conti is at University of Sussex.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:326 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.91 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198263384

ISBN - 13:9780198263388

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`Those of us who are already charmed by Farrer's work (his scholarly writing or superb homilies) will welcome this volume ... Conti's exposition of Farrer's arguments is often skillful and spirited ... a fine narrative or study of the arguments and themes at stake.'The Journal of Religion