Methodism and Education 1849-1902: J. H. Rigg, Romanism, and Wesleyan Schools by John T. Smith

Methodism and Education 1849-1902: J. H. Rigg, Romanism, and Wesleyan Schools

byJohn T. Smith

Hardcover | October 1, 1998

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This book has three interlocking themes. It is concerned first with the advance and subsequent decline of the Wesleyan Methodist efforts in education during the nineteenth century. Secondly, it is about Dr James Harrison Rigg, an irascible and self-opinionated Victorian minister who becamePrincipal of Westminster Methodist Training College and President of the Methodist Conference. He had a dominant influence over his church for many years and dictated its education policy. He also gained the ear of many in government who were formulating educational legislation, and the bookassesses his influence on government ideas. The final and overriding theme of the book is the anti-Catholicism within the Methodist church throughout the nineteenth century, which influenced Wesleyan attitudes towards government education policy in general and towards Anglican `Tractarian' schoolsin particular. The book is invaluable for students of nineteenth century religious history and is worthwhile for others interested in ecclesiastical history.

About The Author

John T. Smith is at University of Hull.

Details & Specs

Title:Methodism and Education 1849-1902: J. H. Rigg, Romanism, and Wesleyan SchoolsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:270 pages, 8.43 × 5.35 × 0.79 inPublished:October 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198269641

ISBN - 13:9780198269649

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`this is a well-researched study which clearly charts the complex story of Wesleyan education in relation to rival developments. It forms a very useful addition to the growing literature on nineteeth-century Methodism.'Ian Machin, The Catholic Historical Review.