Mexican Labor and World War II: Braceros in the Pacific Northwest, 1942-1947

Paperback | October 1, 2000

byErasmo GamboaForeword byKevin Leonard

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"Although Mexican migrant workers have toiled in the fields of the Pacific Northwest since the turn of the century, and although they comprise the largest work force in the region’s agriculture today, they have been virtually invisible in the region’s written labor history. Erasmo Gamboa’s study of the bracero program during World War II is an important beginning, describing and documenting the labor history of Mexican and Chicano workers in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and contributing to our knowledge of farm labor."—Oregon Historical Quarterly

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"Although Mexican migrant workers have toiled in the fields of the Pacific Northwest since the turn of the century, and although they comprise the largest work force in the region’s agriculture today, they have been virtually invisible in the region’s written labor history. Erasmo Gamboa’s study of the bracero program during World War ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:208 pages, 1 × 1 × 0.49 inPublished:October 1, 2000Publisher:University Of Washington Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:029597849X

ISBN - 13:9780295978499

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Table of Contents

Foreword by Kevin Allen LeonardPreface to the 2000 Paperback EditionAcknowledgmentsIntroductionAgribusiness and Mexican MigrationWorld War II and the Farm Labor CrisisThe Bracero WorkerHuelgas: Bracero StrikesBracero Social LifeFrom braceros to Chicano Farm Migrant WorkersConclusionNotesBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

Gamboa claims that the experiences of Mexican contract laborers in the Pacific Northwest were unique. These braceros encountered more discriminatory wage systems, working conditions that ‘truly dehumanized’ them, strong racial animosity, and little recognition for their role in keeping Northwest agriculture afloat during World War II. These braceros, the most militant of all such laborers, fought back with strikes. - Journal of the West