Milton and the Natural World: Science and Poetry in Paradise Lost by Karen L. EdwardsMilton and the Natural World: Science and Poetry in Paradise Lost by Karen L. Edwards

Milton and the Natural World: Science and Poetry in Paradise Lost

byKaren L. Edwards

Paperback | July 7, 2005

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Karen Edwards offers a fresh view of Paradise Lost, in which Milton is shown to represent Eden's plants and animals in the light of the century's new, scientific natural history. Debunking the fabulous lore of the old science, the poem embraces new imaginative and symbolic possibilities for depicting the natural world, suggested by the speculations of Milton's scientific contemporaries including Robert Boyle, Thomas Browne and John Evelyn. The natural world in Paradise Lost, with its flowers and trees, insects and beasts, emerges as a text alive with meaning.

Details & Specs

Title:Milton and the Natural World: Science and Poetry in Paradise LostFormat:PaperbackDimensions:280 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.59 inPublished:July 7, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521017483

ISBN - 13:9780521017480

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Table of Contents

Introduction; Part I. Re-reading the Book of the World: 1. Corrupting experience: Satan and Eve; 2. Experimentalists and the book of the world; 3. The place of experimental reading; Part II. Reforming Animals: 4. Milton's complicated serpents; 5. New uses for monstrous lore; 6. From rarities to representatives; 7. Rehabilitating the political animal; Part III. Transplanting the Garden. 8. Naming and not naming; 9. Botanical discretion; 10. Flourishing colors; 11. The balm of life; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"With her well-informed and sensitive understanding of the way Milton and his scientific contemporaries read the book of nature, Edwards could refute the most outrageous charges against early scientists at the level those arguments operate." Review