Ministers and Ministries: A Functional Analysis

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

EditorRichard RosebyPeter Bell, Richard Parry

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Ministers and their ministries are the means by which we hold government accountable for providing vital public services such as adequate health, education, and social security benefits. In this provocative book the author systematically examines the persisting and changing features ofWhitehall ministries since 1945. Three case studies - the Scottish Office, the Welsh Office, and the Northern Ireland Office - provide detailed illustrations of the complexity of the issues involved.Professor Rose's analysis raises fresh questions about the priorities of politicians as individuals, and about public priorities involving tens of billions of pounds and millions of public servants. His concluding chapter argues that Mrs Thatcher's attempt to introduce techniques of businessmanagement into government is based upon a fundamental misunderstanding of the priorities of ministers and ministries.

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Ministers and their ministries are the means by which we hold government accountable for providing vital public services such as adequate health, education, and social security benefits. In this provocative book the author systematically examines the persisting and changing features ofWhitehall ministries since 1945. Three case studi...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:296 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.87 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198274866

ISBN - 13:9780198274865

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'The virtue of the book is that it brings together much interesting and useful information and insights on the working of the ministry a an institution. The discussion is well-supported by a good supply of data and clearly presented lists and tables.' Public Administration 8/88