Minority Rights, Majority Rule: Partisanship And The Development Of Congress by Sarah A. BinderMinority Rights, Majority Rule: Partisanship And The Development Of Congress by Sarah A. Binder

Minority Rights, Majority Rule: Partisanship And The Development Of Congress

bySarah A. Binder

Hardcover | June 13, 1997

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Minority Rights, Majority Rule seeks to explain why majority parties have consistently been so powerful in the U.S. House of Representatives while minorities often prevail in the Senate. Dr. Binder charts the history of minority rights in both chambers and explains how partisan battles--fought under rules inherited from the past--have shaped the creation and suppression of minority rights. Dr. Binder's statistical analysis and historical work provide the first comprehensive account of the development of minority rights in Congress and contribute to literature on the historical development of Congress.
Title:Minority Rights, Majority Rule: Partisanship And The Development Of CongressFormat:HardcoverDimensions:256 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.75 inPublished:June 13, 1997Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521582393

ISBN - 13:9780521582391

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Table of Contents

1. The partisan basis of procedural choice; 2. The evolving concepts of house and Senate minority rights; 3. Procedural choice in the early congress: the case of the Previous Question; 4. Allocating minority rights in the house, 1789-1990; 5. Institutionalizing party in the nineteenth century house; 6. Stacking the partisan decks in the twentieth century house; 7. Inherited rules and procedural choice in the Senate; 8. Assessing the partisan theory; Appendices; References.

Editorial Reviews

"In an age when partisan politics and congressional gridlock are under attack, Sarah A. Binder's stufy of procedural change in the House of Representatives and the Senate is most timely. Political historians will find this succinct, never overstated study valuable. Scrupulously documented, it is based on a thorough study of congressional sources such as the Congressional Globe and the Congressional Record, as well as works in political science." Donald B. Cole, The Journal of American History