Mister Kreasey's Demon by Raymond Nickford

Mister Kreasey's Demon

byRaymond Nickford

Kobo ebook | September 13, 2019

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About the author:

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About the book:

Village teacher, Matt Kreasey, is reduced to paranoia by the street-hardened students in his new inner-city London post.

His student, Amy, lets him glimpse at love, but could she, too, be one of those gathering with the hunting knife which has already ended the life of his colleague ?

Can a paranoid stop himself from destroying she, alone, who might have shown him what enduring love could be ?

TAGS for Mister Kreasey's Demon :

Blackheath - London, a farewell to fear, paranoia, the girl who saved her teacher, love, an older man, uplifting...

REVIEWS :

Laxmi Hariharan - Author of The Destiny of Shaitan

"I am a big fan of Nickford's writing.

His descriptions are so rich you can sometimes get lost in the detail but on the whole I found it a great way of getting lost. The characters are what makes this book much more than a story about a paranoid teacher and the strange affection which grows between Matt Kreasey's teenage student, Amy, and himself when confronted by a class of students who torment their every hour and make love difficult to survive between teacher and student.

When Matt tries to help the teenage and stuttering simpleton, Philip, from the danger posed by his own street-hardened students and sees the boy running along a railway line, oblivious to the danger of oncoming trains, the relationship is as tender as that between Matt and Amy, though in its own way moving. Philip, another of his students, is something of a simpleton, a big lumbering sixteen-year-old but, sadly, can only behave like an eager junior school boy, yet perhaps just because of this, he is natural and spontaneous in his recognition of the gentle side of Matt, when all the other students want to take him apart for his sensitivity.

`So would you? Mister Kreasey - Matthew? I mean, would you c-c-come? Come and spot the trains - with me? And not have any more of these t-t-tablets tonight?' Philip asked, fired by his swigs of brandy to offer up sausage-greased fingers with which to discourage his ex-teacher from removing the cap to another little brown medicine bottle of Diazepam.

Kreasey smiled at Philip. The lad possessed a serendipity of a head; full of this, full of that; swayed by his fears, swayed by his heart; swayed by brandy; so much he couldn't settle on anything longer than a pollen-glutted bee crawling in and out of a flower...

I could have read this for the observation of character alone, but the threat of conspiring students - one with a hunting knife - and the glimpse at real love that a paranoid might one day see in full with Amy made this a well worth the read.

Some unusual companions for characters but they come alive on the page.

The characters are what makes this book much more than a story about a paranoid teacher and the strange affection which grows between Matt Kreasey's teenage student, Amy, and himself when confronted by a class of students who torment their every hour and make love difficult to survive between teacher and student."

Barbara Erskine - Author of Lady of Hay

"Beautifully observed characters. Atmospheric and Intriguing."

A. Rushbrooke -

"Teacher, lover or lamb to the slaughter?

Teenage students take a sensitive paranoid teacher apart like a pack of wolves. When you expect Matt would be reduced to hatred, you still see a side of him which is tender.

I wanted to find out whether Matt would survive - not so much the knife or the collective beating - but his demons and I suppose, most of all, the one chance at love with Amy that might elude him."
 

Marsha Moore - Author of The Hating Game.

"As a former London teacher, Raymond Nickford has nailed the teacher's fear of the 'Lord of the Flies' pack mentality perfectly. And what a cliffhanger!"

 

Bernard Forrest -

"Love where you might not expect to find it.

Basically, this is a moving character-driven story of a simple love trying to blossom when hemmed in on so many sides by the ever-present threat of teacher Matt Kreasey's malcontent back-street students who daily grow more resentful of the all too sensitive man who dares to teach them poetry. 

Class divides and rags to riches themes have already been done brilliantly - but to death - by other authors such as Catherine Cookson, yet while Mister Kreasey's Demon also has elements of these ever present themes, it stands out for its unforgettable observation of character."

 

Jane Alexander - Author of Walker

"This sends shivers down the spine.... the author does anxiety/paranoia so chillingly well."

Title:Mister Kreasey's DemonFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:September 13, 2019Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN:9990053967126

Reviews

From the Author

Broken by his street-hardened London students, reduced to paranoia, can Amy's teacher stop himself losing she, alone, he might have trusted, might have loved ?Mister Kreasey's DemonVisiting his apartment to bring her teacher a long overdue essay, Kreasey noticed :"Amy stood on her very highest heels, the ones that gave her an extra three-and-a-half inches over a world that had always seemed to look down on her beyond the narrow backs streets from which she'd been born. On her first visit, she had seemed almost undernourished, shivering in a short skirt with a slit up the side. He'd wanted to tell her that she'd made him happy - just by appearing on his doorstep with her essay and those eyes... eyes which spoke of deprivation and yet held, for him, openness and simplicity more beautiful than he'd seen in any student before.Amy, alone among his students, had tried to help him. She was searching his eyes, confused. He recalled those moments when, beside him in bed, her face had shared that open comic side of her lovemaking with him. He couldn't forget how much she'd tried to be his passport to those roughnecks from classroom 12D... those who always seemed to be gathering with a hunting knife, getting closer...'Well, are we going to see you in them?' she smiled, still holding his shorts out like a trophy. But as he watched her lips, they seemed to shape like those in a poorly dubbed film where the voice is out-of-sync with the words... reminding him to 'eat up' all his tablets and then he'd never be 'cut up' . ”Editorial Reviews :“ An atmospheric, vibrant, almost spooky page-turner and a psychological suspense, both moving and tender. ”Reay Tannahill - historian, novelist and author of The Seventh Son.“ As a former London teacher, Raymond Nickford has nailed the teacher's fear of the 'Lord of the Flies' pack mentality perfectly. And what a cliffhanger ! ”Marsha Moore - author of The Hating Game.The author, Raymond Nickford, has a degree in Psychology and Philosophy from University College of North Wales. Troubled souls, the lonely, his inspiration.Other TitlesFamily Tree : Stories of Love Beyond the GraveThe body of Eddy's mother was found entangled in fungus-laden roots of the rotting ancient yew on the cemetery side of the family's garden fence. At nights, Eddy stutters, imploring his father to believe that the tree – or is it his mother – seems to call him. Dad just keeps saying “Grief works in strange ways, boy. You'll heal !” But that tree... Mum... calls. Should he sneak out... to the cemetery side? Or had Mum gone to that cold place which Dad kept saying was “Just death by misadventure, Eddy, as the autopsy stated” ?Loss of family and loved ones revealing how, for those left behind, hurt and longing can find resolution – where unexpected.Twists in the TaleSchizophrenic Sam Baldock says he 'hears' Beethoven calling him. For therapy, his doctor and daughter Joanne accompany Sam to the Beethoven Museum in Vienna, once the composer's apartment. Will lonely Joanne, at last, get closer - to her strange Dad ?Aristo's FamilyAristo, private museum curator in Paphos, Cyprus, living alone with his sole surviving son Pavlos, is obsessed with his belief that he still has surviving family, even though told they were all burned during the Turkish invasion of Cyprus in 1974.In his preoccupation he has come to to neglect Pavlos. Yet both Aristo's and his son's deepening need to belong, so long mutually exclusive, are at the core of this novel. Father and son... or strangers forever ?