Moderne, Postmoderne - und nun Barock?  Entwicklungslinien der Architektur des 20.  Jahrhunderts by Stefan GrundmannModerne, Postmoderne - und nun Barock?  Entwicklungslinien der Architektur des 20.  Jahrhunderts by Stefan Grundmann

Moderne, Postmoderne - und nun Barock? Entwicklungslinien der Architektur des 20. Jahrhunderts

byStefan Grundmann

Hardcover | June 26, 1996

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Discusses the development of modern architecture in the context of architectural history.
Title:Moderne, Postmoderne - und nun Barock? Entwicklungslinien der Architektur des 20. JahrhundertsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:136 pages, 11.46 × 9.48 × 0.68 inPublished:June 26, 1996Publisher:Edition Axel Menges

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:3930698633

ISBN - 13:9783930698639

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>>This book is an attempt at architectural criticismThe truth is that the International Style reflects the basic forces that architecture can express extraordinarily impressively and always with decided interplay, and thus also with a pronounced unity of effect; and additionally it develops these formal values especially intensively from content. Traditionally such things are called classical. What followed this, the whole spectrum of styles from late Modernism via High-Tech and Deconstructivism to Post-Modernism is all a reaction to the unity of the International Style: either one point -- in terms of form or content -- is taken out, exaggerated and thus made into its opposite, or such a point is consciously negated. Until now thisphenomenon has been known as Mannerism to art historians. What is characteristic of Baroque as the period after High Renaissance Classicism and Mannerism is less clear; in any case, entirely positive aspects of both found their way into Baroque, and undoubtedly the latter is closer to High Renaissance Classicism in spirit than to Mannerism. Cannot similar things be seen in the last bare decade of architectural development?The foundations for this book were laid during a good year's research at the University of Califo