Modernism, Romance and the Fin de Siècle: Popular Fiction And British Culture by Nicholas DalyModernism, Romance and the Fin de Siècle: Popular Fiction And British Culture by Nicholas Daly

Modernism, Romance and the Fin de Siècle: Popular Fiction And British Culture

byNicholas Daly

Paperback | February 12, 2007

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Nicholas Daly explores the popular fiction of the "romance revival" of the late Victorian and Edwardian years, focusing on authors such as Bram Stoker, H. Rider Haggard and Arthur Conan Doyle. Drawing on recent work in cultural studies, Daly argues that these adventure narratives provided a narrative of cultural change at a time when Britain was trying to accommodate the "new imperialism." The presence of a genre such as romance within modernism, he claims, should force a questioning of the usual distinction between high and popular culture.
Title:Modernism, Romance and the Fin de Siècle: Popular Fiction And British CultureFormat:PaperbackDimensions:232 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:February 12, 2007Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052103292X

ISBN - 13:9780521032926

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. Incorporated bodies: Dracula and professionalism; 2. The imperial treasure hunt: The Snake's Pass and the limits of romance; 3. 'Mummie is become merchandise': the mummy story as commodity theory; 4. Across the great divide: modernism, popular fiction and the primitive; Afterword: the long goodbye; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"I nonetheless find The Spectale of Intimacy a stimulating and satisfying book... One of the satisfying qualities of The Spectale of Intimacy is that it preserves a nice balance between the general and the specific enough but not too much of either- that nicely replicates the very method of their exploration of the relationship between the public and the private in Victorian society." Studies in the Novel