Modes of Viewing in Hellenistic Poetry and Art: And Art

Paperback | December 13, 2007

byGraham Zanker

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Taking a fresh look at the poetry and visual art of the Hellenistic age, from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. to the Romans’ defeat of Cleopatra in 30 B.C., Graham Zanker makes enlightening discoveries about the assumptions and conventions of Hellenistic poets and artists and their audiences.
            Zanker’s exciting new interpretations closely compare poetry and art for the light each sheds on the other. He finds, for example, an exuberant expansion of subject matter in the Hellenistic periods in both literature and art, as styles and iconographic traditions reserved for grander concepts in earlier eras were applied to themes, motifs, and subjects that were emphatically less grand.

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Taking a fresh look at the poetry and visual art of the Hellenistic age, from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. to the Romans’ defeat of Cleopatra in 30 B.C., Graham Zanker makes enlightening discoveries about the assumptions and conventions of Hellenistic poets and artists and their audiences.             Zanker’s exciting ...

Graham Zanker is professor of Classics at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. He is the author of The Heart of Achilles and Realism in Alexandrian Poetry.

other books by Graham Zanker

Modes Of Viewing In Hellenistic Poetry and Art
Modes Of Viewing In Hellenistic Poetry and Art

Kobo ebook|Feb 1 2008

$17.19 online$22.24list price(save 22%)
Format:PaperbackDimensions:248 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.8 inPublished:December 13, 2007Publisher:University Of Wisconsin PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:029919454X

ISBN - 13:9780299194543

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“Hellenistic poetry and art from a new and enlightening angle [that] encourages further reflection on the interconnections between the literary and plastic arts and what they tell us about the artists and their times.”—James Clauss, Bryn Mawr Classical Review