Moral Skepticism by Walter Sinnott-armstrong

Moral Skepticism

byWalter Sinnott-armstrong

Paperback | November 2, 2007

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Sinnott-Armstrong here provides an extensive survey of the difficult subject of moral beliefs. He covers theories that grapple with questions of morality such as naturalism, normativism, intuitionism, and coherentism. He then defends his own theory that he calls "moderate moral skepticism,"which is that moral beliefs can be justified, but not extremely justified.

About The Author

Walter Sinnott-Armstrong is Professor of Philosophy at Dartmouth College.
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Details & Specs

Title:Moral SkepticismFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 6.1 × 9.09 × 0.79 inPublished:November 2, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195342062

ISBN - 13:9780195342062

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Table of Contents

Part I: Issues1. What Is Moral Epistemology?2. Are Moral Beliefs Truth-Apt?3. Are Any Moral Beliefs True?4. Are Any Moral Beliefs Justified?5. In Contrast with What?6. Classy Moral PyrrhonismPart II: Theories7. Naturalism8. Normativism9. Intuitionism10. Coherentism

Editorial Reviews

"Walter Sinnott-Armstrong has long been a leading proponent of moral skepticism -- the view roughly that there is some considerable difficulty involved in attaining justified moral belief, or moral knowledge. This volume brings together his latest thoughts on the matter and provides, inaddition, a survey of different sorts of skeptical problems confronting realists and cognitivists about morality... well written and covers an impressive expanse of territory. It is to be welcomed, further, as the only major book-length treatment of the topics of moral epistemology and moralskepticism to appear in some time." --Brad Majors, ETHICS