Morality, Mortality: Volume I: Death and Whom to Save from It: Morality Mortality V0

Paperback | January 1, 1998

byF. M. Kamm

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Why is death bad for us, even on the assumption that it involves the absence of experience? Is it worse for us than prenatal nonexistence? Kamm begins by considering these questions, critically examining some answers other philosophers have given. She explores in detail suggestions based onour greater concern over the loss of future versus past goods and those based on the insult to persons which death involves. In the second part, Kamm deals with the question, "Whom should we save from death if we cannot save everyone?" She considers whether and when the numbers of lives we cansave matter in our choice, and whether the extra good we achieve if we save some lives rather than others should play a role in deciding whom to save. Issues such as fairness, solidarity, the role of random decision procedures, and the relation between subjective and objective points of view arediscussed, with an eye to properly incorporating these into a nonconsequentialist ethical theory. In conclusion, the book examines specifically what differences between persons are relevant to the distribution of any scarce resource, discussing for example, the distribution (and acquisition) ofbodily organs for transplantation. Kamm provides criticism of some current procedures for distribution and acquisition of a scarce resource and makes suggestions for alternatives.

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From Our Editors

Why is death considered bad? Is death worse than prenatal nonexistence? In a fascinating exploration of life and death, philosopher F.M. Kamm considers these questions in relation to "Whom should we save from death if we cannot save everyone?" Kamm looks at whether the extra good we achieve if we save particular lives rather than other...

From the Publisher

Why is death bad for us, even on the assumption that it involves the absence of experience? Is it worse for us than prenatal nonexistence? Kamm begins by considering these questions, critically examining some answers other philosophers have given. She explores in detail suggestions based onour greater concern over the loss of future ...

F. M. Kamm is at New York University.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 9.09 × 5.98 × 0.91 inPublished:January 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195119118

ISBN - 13:9780195119114

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Table of Contents

Introduction Part I: Death: From Bad to Worse 1. Why is Death Bad? 2. The Asymmetry Problem: Dath and Prenatal Nonexistence 3. Accounting for Asymmetry? 4. Appropriate Attitudes toward Nonexistence Appendix: Inclines and Declines Part II: Saving Lives: General Issues 5. Is It Worse If More Die: Agent Relative or Non-Relative Views? 6. Is It Right to Save the Greater Number? 7. Ideal Procedure, Nonideal Alternatives, and Proportional Chances 8. Are There Irrelevant Utilities? 9. Sobjectivity: The Anatomy of the Subjective and Objective in Moral Judgment 10. Sobjectivity: Aggregation and Scales of Equivalents and Cost Part III: Scarce Resources: Theoretical Issues, Specific Recommendations, and Organ Transplants 11. Acquisition of Organs 12. Distribution of Resources: Need and Outcome 13. Distribution of Resources: Urgency and Outcome 14. Distribution of Resources: Outcome, Waiting Time and Money 15. Procedures for Distribution

From Our Editors

Why is death considered bad? Is death worse than prenatal nonexistence? In a fascinating exploration of life and death, philosopher F.M. Kamm considers these questions in relation to "Whom should we save from death if we cannot save everyone?" Kamm looks at whether the extra good we achieve if we save particular lives rather than others should play a role in deciding whom to save.

Editorial Reviews

"...a major achievement in normative ethics, one that substantially advances the philosophical discussion about death and the morality of decisions involving death in the face of scarce resources."--The Philosophical Review