Mound Builders by Robert SilverbergMound Builders by Robert Silverberg

Mound Builders

byRobert Silverberg

Paperback | May 1, 1986

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In Illinois, the one-hundred-foot Cahokia Mound spreads impressively across sixteen acres, and as many as ten thousand more mounds dot the Ohio River Valley alone. The Mound Builders traces the speculation surrounding these monuments and the scientific excavations which uncovered the history and culture of the ancient Americans who built them.

The mounds were constructed for religious and secular purposes some time between 1000 B.C. and 1000 A.D., and they have prompted curiosity and speculation from very early times. European settlers found them evidence of some ancient and glorious people. Even as eminent an American as Thomas Jefferson joined the controversy, though his conclusions—that the mounds were actually cemeteries of ancient Indians—remained unpopular for nearly a century.

Only in the late 19th century, as Smithsonian Institution investigators developed careful methodologies and reliable records, did the period of scientific investigation of the mounds and their builders begin. Silverberg follows these excavations and then recounts the story they revealed of the origins, development, and demise of the mound builder culture.

Robert Silverberg, author of such science fiction classics as Lord Valentine’s Castle, also writes books reflecting his special interest in myth, history, archaeology, and anthropology.
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Title:Mound BuildersFormat:PaperbackDimensions:276 pages, 7.88 × 7.08 × 0.7 inPublished:May 1, 1986Publisher:Ohio University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0821408399

ISBN - 13:9780821408391

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Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Our forebears, finding large, incomprehensible earthworks scattered down the Mississippi Valley, refused to believe they were built by the aborigines who still cluttered up the place and impeded settlement. Mr. Silverberg describes, with gleeful and copious quotation, the nineteenth-century literature of speculation which attributed these monuments to Phoenicians, stray Vikings, the lost tribes of Israel, refugees from Atlantis, an extinct race of giants, and Welshmen. The book, which is charmingly written, ends with a history of the archaeological work which gave the mounds back to the Indians.”—Atlantic Monthly