Mountain Gloom and Mountain Glory: The Development of the Aesthetics of the Infinite

Paperback | February 1, 1997

byMarjorie Hope Nicolson, William CrononForeword byWilliam Cronon

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To English poets and writers of the seventeenth century, as to their predecessors, mountains were ugly protuberances which disfigured nature and threatened the symmetry of earth; they were symbols God's wrath. Yet, less than two centuries later the romantic poets sang in praise of mountain splendor, of glorious heights that stirred their souls to divine ecstasy. In this very readable and fascinating study, Marjorie Hope Nicolson considers the intellectual renaissance at the close of the seventeenth century that caused the shift from mountain gloom to mountain glory. She examines various writers from the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries and traces both the causes and the process of this drastic change in perception.

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From Our Editors

To English poets and writers of the seventeenth century, as to their predecessors, mountains were ugly protuberances which disfigured nature and threatened the symmetry of earth; they were symbols of God's wrath. Yet, less than two centuries later the romantic poets sang in praise of mountain splendor, of glorious heights that stirred ...

From the Publisher

To English poets and writers of the seventeenth century, as to their predecessors, mountains were ugly protuberances which disfigured nature and threatened the symmetry of earth; they were symbols God's wrath. Yet, less than two centuries later the romantic poets sang in praise of mountain splendor, of glorious heights that stirred the...

From the Jacket

In this very readable and fascinating study, Marjorie Hope Nicolson considers the intellectual renaissance at the close of the seventeenth century that caused the shift from mountain gloom to mountain glory. She examines various writers from the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries and traces both the causes and the proces...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:432 pages, 8.5 × 6 × 1 inPublished:February 1, 1997Publisher:University of Washington Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295975776

ISBN - 13:9780295975771

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Table of Contents

Foreword by William CrononPrefaceIntroductionThe Literary HeritageThe Tehological DilemmaNew PhilosophyThe Geological DilemmaA Sacred Theory of the EarthThe Burnet ControversyThe Aesthetics of the InfiniteA New Descriptive PoetryEpilogueIndex

From Our Editors

To English poets and writers of the seventeenth century, as to their predecessors, mountains were ugly protuberances which disfigured nature and threatened the symmetry of earth; they were symbols of God's wrath. Yet, less than two centuries later the romantic poets sang in praise of mountain splendor, of glorious heights that stirred their souls to divine ecstasy. In this very readable and fascinating study, Marjorie Hope Nicolson considers the intellectual renaissance at the close of the seventeenth century that caused the shift from mountain gloom to mountain glory. She examines various writers from the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries and traces both the causes and the process of this drastic change in perception.

Editorial Reviews

This seminal work on nature and the sublime will remain a classic and a source of inspiration for generations to come.

- Barbara Novak, author of Nature and Culture: American Landscape and Painting, 1825-1875