Mourning Dove: A Salishan Autobiography by Jay Mourning DoveMourning Dove: A Salishan Autobiography by Jay Mourning Dove

Mourning Dove: A Salishan Autobiography

byJay Mourning DoveEditorJay Miller

Paperback | February 1, 1994

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Mourning Dove was the pen name of Christine Quintasket, a member of the Colville Federated Tribes of eastern Washington State. She was the author of Cogewea, The Half-Blood (one of the first novels to be published by a Native American woman) and Coyote Stories, both reprinted as Bison Books. Jay Miller, formerly assistant director and editor at the D'Arcy McNickle Center for the History of the American Indian, Newberry Library, Chicago, now is an independent scholar and writer in Seattle. He is the compiler of Earthmaker: Tribal Stories from Native North America.
Mourning Dove was the pen name of Christine Quintasket, a member of the Colville Federated Tribes of eastern Washington State. She was the author of Cogewea, The Half-Blood (one of the first novels to be published by a Native American woman) and Coyote Stories, both reprinted as Bison Books. Jay Miller, formerly assistant director and ...
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Title:Mourning Dove: A Salishan AutobiographyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:267 pages, 8.5 × 5.32 × 0.66 inPublished:February 1, 1994Publisher:UNP - Bison Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0803282079

ISBN - 13:9780803282070

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Editorial Reviews

"[This] autobiography artfully weaves tribal history, Salishan traditions, and a wealth of information of the female life cycle with the story of [Christine] Quintasket's own childhood and coming of age on the Colville Reservation in Washington. "Mourning Dove" is a rare and important study of the Interior Salish people during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Miller, by providing thoughtful editing and constructive footnotes, have given new life to Mourning Dove's narrative."-"Western Historical Quarterly,"