Moving Mountains: Ethnicity and Livelihoods in Highland China, Vietnam, and Laos by Jean MichaudMoving Mountains: Ethnicity and Livelihoods in Highland China, Vietnam, and Laos by Jean Michaud

Moving Mountains: Ethnicity and Livelihoods in Highland China, Vietnam, and Laos

EditorJean Michaud, Tim Forsyth

Paperback | December 1, 2011

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The mountainous borderlands of socialist China, Vietnam, and Laos are home to some seventy million people, representing an astonishing array of ethnic diversity. How are these peoples fashioning livelihoods now that their homeland is open to economic investment and political change?

Moving Mountains presents the work of anthropologists, geographers, and political economists with first-hand experience in the Southeast Asian Massif. Together, they show that the parallel experiences of ethnic minorities in these three socialist regimes offer a unique opportunity to explore the intersection of ethnicity, livelihood, and state-society relations. Case studies on groups such as the Drung in Yunnan, the Khmu in Laos, and the Hmong in Vietnam document the experiences of such minorities under socialist regimes and how their lives are changing under more open political and economic conditions.

Although scholars have typically represented highland people as marginalized and powerless, Moving Mountains argues that they draw on culture and ethnicity to indigenize modernity and maintain their livelihoods. This unprecedented glimpse into a poorly understood region shows that development initiatives must be built on strong knowledge of local cultures in order to have lasting effect.

Jean Michaud is a professor in the Department of Anthropology at Université Laval. Tim Forsyth is a reader in environment and development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Contributors: Steeve Daviau, Olivier Évrard, Tim Forsyth, Stéphane Gros, Terry McGee, John McKinnon, Marie Mellac, Jean Michaud, Janet C. Stu...
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Title:Moving Mountains: Ethnicity and Livelihoods in Highland China, Vietnam, and LaosFormat:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 9 × 6.02 × 0.62 inPublished:December 1, 2011Publisher:Ubc PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0774818387

ISBN - 13:9780774818384

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Reviews

Table of Contents

Illustrations

Foreword / Terry McGee

Acknowledgments

1 Rethinking the Relationships between Livelihoods and Ethnicity in Highland China, Vietnam, and Laos / Tim Forsyth and Jean Michaud

2 Economic Marginalization and Social Identity among the Drung People of Northwest Yunnan / Stéphane Gros

3 Integration of a Lineage Society on the Laos-Vietnam Border / Steeve Daviau

4 Oral Histories of Livelihoods and Migration under Socialism and Post-Socialism among the Khmu of Northern Laos / Olivier Évrard

5 Of Rice and Spice: Hmong Livelihood and Diversification in the Northern Vietnam Uplands / Claire Tugault-Lafleur and Sarah Turner

6 Hani Agency and Ways of Seeing Environmental Change on the China-Vietnam Border / John McKinnon

7 Land Reform and Changing Identities in Two Tai-Speaking Districts in Northern Vietnam / Marie Mellac

8 Commoditized Ethnicity for Tourism Development in Yunnan / Margaret Byrne Swain

9 Rubber Transformations: Post-Socialist Livelihoods and Identities for Akha and Tai Lue Farmers in Xishuangbanna, China / Janet C. Sturgeon

10 Conclusion: Lesson for the Future / Jean Michaud

Contributors

Index

Editorial Reviews

The mountainous borderlands of socialist China, Vietnam, and Laos are home to some seventy million minority people of diverse ethnicities. In Moving Mountains, anthropologists, geographers, and political economists with first-hand experience in the region explore these peoples’ survival strategies, as they respond to unprecedented economic and political change. Although highland peoples are typically represented as marginalized and powerless, this volume argues that ethnic minorities draw on culture and ethnicity to indigenize modernity and maintain their livelihoods. This unprecedented glimpse into a poorly understood region shows that development initiatives must be built on strong knowledge of local cultures in order to have lasting effect.Moving Mountains manages the rare feat of bringing together a fine-tooth comb ethnography of upland peoples on the one hand with a theoretical and conceptual subtlety about the reach and limits of state power on the other. It becomes, on the spot, the indispensable source for understanding the socialist margins of Southeast Asia. - James C. Scott, Sterling Professor of Political Science and Anthropology, Yale University