Mrs Oliphant: A Fiction to Herself: A Literary Life

Hardcover | June 1, 1995

byElisabeth Jay

not yet rated|write a review
As an expatriate Scots woman, Mrs Margaret Oliphant (1828-97) started her prolific and accomplished writing career at three removes from the centre of Victorian literary life. Widowed early, and left with not only her own children, but two brothers, a nephew and two nieces to support, shebecame keenly aware of the discrepancy between society's assumptions about woman's role and her own position as a female breadwinner in the male-dominated world of nineteenth-century publishing. Out of the contrast between her wryly ironic view of life and the conventions of Victorian fiction camethe disconcerting questioning of accepted ideologies of the family, religious orthodoxy and a woman's place in society that characterizes her writing.Mrs Oliphant: A Fiction to Herself paints an often surprising picture of the professional Victorian woman writer. By choosing to interweave the life and the work of Mrs Oliphant, Elisabeth Jay's lucid and comprehensive study raises for consideration the way in which a particular woman writerperceived her own life, and the wider question of whether women writers have been well-served by the mythological structures of male biography.'Elisabeth Jay has drawn upon Oliphant's wide-ranging writing in numerous modes, to give a comprehensive and often surprising portrait of the professional Victorian woman writer. This study of Oliphant's career as a professional Victorian writer, of her critical and intellectual interests, and theextraordinary way in which she managed fiction and journalism over her career, will cast a new light on the period.Elaine Showalter, Professor of English, Princeton Univesity

Pricing and Purchase Info

$199.77 online
$267.00 list price (save 25%)
Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

As an expatriate Scots woman, Mrs Margaret Oliphant (1828-97) started her prolific and accomplished writing career at three removes from the centre of Victorian literary life. Widowed early, and left with not only her own children, but two brothers, a nephew and two nieces to support, shebecame keenly aware of the discrepancy between ...

From the Jacket

As an expatriate Scots woman, Mrs Margaret Oliphant (1828-97) started her prolific and accomplished writing career at three removes from the centre of Victorian literary life. Widowed early, and left with not only her own children, but two brothers, a nephew, and two nieces to support, she became keenly aware of the discrepancy between...

Editor of The Autobiography of Margaret Oliphant: The Complete Text (OUP, 1990), Author of The Religion of the Heart (OUP, 1979), Faith and Doubt in Victorian Britain (Macmillan, 1986), and editor of The Journal of John Wesley (OUP, 1987)

other books by Elisabeth Jay

Interpreting the Internet: Feminist and Queer Counterpublics in Latin America
Interpreting the Internet: Feminist and Queer Counterpu...

Kobo ebook|Dec 20 2016

$30.29 online$39.30list price(save 22%)
The Life of Charlotte Bronte
The Life of Charlotte Bronte

Kobo ebook|Nov 25 2004

$15.69 online$20.34list price(save 22%)
see all books by Elisabeth Jay
Format:HardcoverDimensions:366 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.06 inPublished:June 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198128754

ISBN - 13:9780198128755

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Mrs Oliphant: A Fiction to Herself: A Literary Life

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

`She manages to involve us in Mrs Oliphant's unknown books to such an extent, and with such skill, that I for one became quite convinced that, instead of having read four of the novels and one of the biographies...I had read them all. This is a rare achievement for an academic study, but Jayis unusaually patient and attentive to her reaer, and it shows at every stage. ...her book is a truly literary biography, concerned to show how Mrs oliphant's writing both mirrored and evaded her concerns.'Times Literary Supplement