Murder Trials

Paperback | September 30, 1975

byMarcus Tullius CiceroTranslated byMichael GrantIntroduction byMichael Grant

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"Whereas the place for prejudice is a public meeting, a court of law is the adobe of truth."
 
Cicero was still in his twenties when he got Sextus Roscius off a charge of murdering his father and nearly sixty when he defended King Deiotarus, accused of trying to murder Caesar. In between (with, among others, his speeches for Cluentius and Rabirius), he built a reputation as the greatest orator of his time.
 
Cicero defended his practice partly on moral or compassionate grounds of "human decency" -  sentiments with which we today would agree. His clients generally went free. And in vindicating men - who sometimes did not deserve it - he left us a mass of detail about Roman life, law and history and, in two of the speeches, graphic pictures of the "gun-law" of small provincial towns.
 
For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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From Our Editors

His clients generally went free. In his 20s, he exonerated Sextus Roscius of a patricide charge. Nearly 60, he defended King Deiotarus, accused of attempting Caesar’s murder. In the connecting years, Cicero became known as his age’s leading orator. Forward-thinking Cicero defended his practice on moral and compassionate grounds of ...

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"Whereas the place for prejudice is a public meeting, a court of law is the adobe of truth."   Cicero was still in his twenties when he got Sextus Roscius off a charge of murdering his father and nearly sixty when he defended King Deiotarus, accused of trying to murder Caesar. In between (with, among others, his speeches for Cluentius ...

From the Jacket

Cicero was still in his twenties when he got Sextus Roscius off a charge of murdering his father and nearly sixty when he defended King Deiotarus, accused of trying to murder Caesar. In between (with, among others, his speeches for Cluentius and Rabirius), he built a reputation as the greatest orator of his time.Cicero defended his pra...

An accomplished poet, philosopher, rhetorician, and humorist, Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC-43 BC) was also the greatest forensic orator Rome ever produced. But to Cicero, service to the res publica (literally, "the public affair") was a Roman citizen's highest duty. At age 26 (in 80 BC), he successfully defended a man prosecuted unju...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 8 × 5.2 × 0.7 inPublished:September 30, 1975Publisher:Penguin Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:014044288X

ISBN - 13:9780140442885

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Table of Contents

Murder Trials Introduction
I. In Defence of Sextus Roscius of Ameria
1. The Innocence of Sextus Roscius
2. The Guilt of Magnus and Capito
3. Chrysogonus: the Criminal behind the Scenes
II. In Defence of Aulus Cluentius Habitus
1. The Trial and Crimes of Oppianicus
2. Previous Verdicts Quoted AGainst Cluentius
3. The Innocence of Cluentius
III. In Defence of Gaius Rabirius
IV. Note on the Speeches in Defence of Caelius and Milo
V. In Defence of King Deiotarus
Appendix A: List of Terms
Appendix B: Genealogical Tables
Appendix C: Table of Dates
Appendix D: Further Reading
Maps
Index

From Our Editors

His clients generally went free. In his 20s, he exonerated Sextus Roscius of a patricide charge. Nearly 60, he defended King Deiotarus, accused of attempting Caesar’s murder. In the connecting years, Cicero became known as his age’s leading orator. Forward-thinking Cicero defended his practice on moral and compassionate grounds of human decency. While Murder Trials reveals Cicero vindicating men who did not always deserve it, it also provides a fascinating and detailed record of Roman life, law and history. Two of the speeches provide vivid portraits of the gun law of small provincial towns. Translator Michael Grant captures Cicero’s eloquence, power and persuasiveness.