My Antonia

by Willa Cather

Ebookslib | July 24, 2015 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

My Antonia is rated 4 out of 5 by 1.
LAST summer I happened to be crossing the plains of Iowa in a season of intense heat, and it was my good fortune to have for a traveling companion James Quayle Burden - Jim Burden, as we still call him in the West. He and I are old friends - we grew up together in the same Nebraska town - and we had much to say to each other. While the train flashed through never-ending miles of ripe wheat, by country towns and bright-flowered pastures and oak groves wilting in the sun, we sat in the observation car, where the woodwork was hot to the touch and red dust lay deep over everything

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: July 24, 2015

Publisher: Ebookslib

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1412188237

ISBN - 13: 9781412188234

Found in: Mystery and Suspense

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Captures the Immigrant Experience Cather's novel of rural life in Nebraska in the early 20th century depicts the struggles of the Shimerda family and the distinct obstacles they face as immigrants and outsiders. This is essential reading for anyone interested in what it feels like as an "other" trying to find an identity in a new country and a new home.
Date published: 2006-06-01

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Kobo eBookMy Antonia

My Antonia

by Willa Cather

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: July 24, 2015

Publisher: Ebookslib

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1412188237

ISBN - 13: 9781412188234

From the Publisher

LAST summer I happened to be crossing the plains of Iowa in a season of intense heat, and it was my good fortune to have for a traveling companion James Quayle Burden - Jim Burden, as we still call him in the West. He and I are old friends - we grew up together in the same Nebraska town - and we had much to say to each other. While the train flashed through never-ending miles of ripe wheat, by country towns and bright-flowered pastures and oak groves wilting in the sun, we sat in the observation car, where the woodwork was hot to the touch and red dust lay deep over everything