Nanoparticulate Vaccine Delivery Systems by Martin J. D'souzaNanoparticulate Vaccine Delivery Systems by Martin J. D'souza

Nanoparticulate Vaccine Delivery Systems

EditorMartin J. D'souza

Hardcover | January 6, 2015

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Recent years have seen the development of novel technologies that use nanoparticles and microparticles to deliver vaccines by the oral and microneedle-based transdermal route of administration. These new technologies enable the formulation of vaccine particles containing vaccine antigens, without loss of their biological activity during the formulation process. Also, multiple antigens, targeting ligands, and adjuvants can all be encapsulated within the same particle. When administered orally, these particles are designed to withstand the acidic environment of the stomach and are targeted to Peyer's patches and the gut-associated mucosal immune system. Since these vaccines are particulate in nature, they are readily taken up by phagocytic antigen-presenting cells, such as M cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages in Peyer's patches of the intestines, resulting in a strong immune response and antibody production. Since no needles are required for oral vaccines, this method of vaccine delivery is inexpensive and suitable for mass vaccination in the developing world as well as the developed world. This book discusses studies conducted on a wide array of vaccines, including vaccines for infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, typhoid, influenza, pneumonia, meningitis, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B. It also discusses recent studies on vaccines for cancers such as melanoma and ovarian, breast, and prostate cancer.

Martin J. D'Souzais professor and director of Graduate Programs, College of Pharmacy, Mercer University, USA, co-director of the Center for Drug Delivery, and director of the Mercer Clinical Laboratory. He has published more than 90 articles in various journals and authored several book chapters and holds four patents. Prof. D'Souza's ...
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Title:Nanoparticulate Vaccine Delivery SystemsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:244 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:January 6, 2015Publisher:Taylor and FrancisLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9814613304

ISBN - 13:9789814613309

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Table of Contents

Introduction to Particulate Vaccine

Methods of Preparation of Nanoparticulate Vaccines

DOE

Routes of Administration

Case Studies

Meningitis Vaccine

TB Oral Vaccine

Cancer Vaccines

Influenza Vaccine

Melanoma Vaccine

Ovarian Cancer Oral Vaccine

Breast Cancer Oral Immunotherapy

Prostate Cancer Vaccine for Oral Delivery

Future Trends in Vaccine Delivery

Editorial Reviews

"This book provides a detailed examination of the design, characterization, delivery, and efficacy of nanoparticulate vaccine delivery systems. It provides an excellent overview with in-depth case studies on the growing literature on novel vaccine delivery systems using nanoparticles." ¿Prof. Mark Prausnitz, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA "Readers will find introductory chapters on preparatory methods for micro/nanoparticles and formulation development and how these delivery systems interact with the immune system, followed by goal-orientated and detailed laboratory studies on nanoparticulate-based prokaryotic vaccines and cancer vaccines. Notably, the book provides several methods for non-parenteral antigen delivery, which is becoming increasingly important, particularly for the latest-generation vaccines against mucosal pathogens." ¿Prof. Myron Christodoulides, University of Southampton, UK "This book is a compelling force in the field of antigen delivery for infectious disease as well as cancer. It represents a thorough exploration of the nanoparticle¿s ability to encapsulate diverse antigens, and immunostimulants, and deliver this payload to antigen-presenting cells, inducing an ensuing effective immune response." ¿Prof. Gary W. Bumgarner, Samford University, USA