Narrative And Meaning In Early Modern England: Brownes Skull and Other Histories by Howard MarchitelloNarrative And Meaning In Early Modern England: Brownes Skull and Other Histories by Howard Marchitello

Narrative And Meaning In Early Modern England: Brownes Skull and Other Histories

byHoward Marchitello

Paperback | May 21, 2007

Pricing and Purchase Info

$68.64

Earn 343 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Howard Marchitello's study of narrative techniques in Renaissance discourse analyzes imaginative conjunctions of literary texts, such as those by Shakespeare and Thomas Browne, with developments in scientific and technical writing. Narrative was used in the Renaissance as both a mode of discourse and an epistemology; it produced knowledge, but also dictated how that knowledge should be understood. Marchitello uses a wide range of cultural documents to illustrate the importance of narrative in constructing the Renaissance understanding of time and identity.
Title:Narrative And Meaning In Early Modern England: Brownes Skull and Other HistoriesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:248 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:May 21, 2007Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521036860

ISBN - 13:9780521036863

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

List of illustrations; Acknowledgements; Introduction: narrationalities; 1. Shakespeare's Othello and Vesalius's Fabrica: anatomy, gender and the narrative production of meaning; 2. (Dis)embodied letters and The Merchant of Venice: writing, editing, history; 3. Political maps: the production of cartography in early modern England; 4. Possessing the New World: historicism and the story of the anecdote; 5. Browne's skull; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Howard Marchitello's Narrative and Meaning in Early Modern England offers a valuable series of deconstructive readings on topics that have beccome significant to Renaissance studies in recent years: the materiality of texts, cartography, anatomy,historiograghy, and status of the historical artifact." Gretchen Schultz South Centeral Review