Narratives Of Class In New Irish And Scottish Literature: From Joyce to Kelman, Doyle, Galloway…

Hardcover | March 15, 2008

byMary M. McGlynn

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Narratives of Class in New Irish and Scottish Literature argues that the outskirts of cities have become spaces for a new literature beyond boundaries of traditional notions of nation, class, and gender.  These new constructions of dwellings and neighborhoods house new notions of the roles of women in the working class, a reconception paralleled by the use of the sorts of textual innovations once presumed to be the territory of metropolitan elites. Chapters on James Kelman, Roddy Doyle, Janice Galloway, and Eoin McNamee examine appropriations of voice, shifts in narrative perspective, and strategic uses of local vernacular as techniques that characterize the explosion of working-class literary production in Scotland and Ireland in the eighties and nineties.

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Narratives of Class in New Irish and Scottish Literature argues that the outskirts of cities have become spaces for a new literature beyond boundaries of traditional notions of nation, class, and gender.  These new constructions of dwellings and neighborhoods house new notions of the roles of women in the working class, a reconception ...

Mary M. McGlynn is Associate Professor of English, Baruch College, City University of New York. She has published and spoken on James Kelman, Roddy Doyle, and other contemporary Scottish and Irish writers, as well as on film, country music, cultural studies, and Irish America.

other books by Mary M. McGlynn

Format:HardcoverDimensions:248 pages, 8.34 × 5.78 × 0.7 inPublished:March 15, 2008Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230602851

ISBN - 13:9780230602854

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"A welcome and useful study of a group of writers in need of more complex critical attention. By including both Irish and Scottish writers in the same study-and writers from both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland-McGlynn enacts the challenge to national boundaries that her study uncovers. The potential impact of such a work on Irish literary studies is especially strong; too often, Irish literature is only studied within nationalist parameters."--Lauren Onkey, Associate Professor of English, Ball State University"McGlynn's book is an excellent choice for the series New Directions in Irish and Irish American Literature, edited by Claire Culleton.  It makes many important moves in this arena, not the least of which is its reconfiguration of what one might call the Celtic fringe, 'with literature as a key crossover" (Maley 205) . . . I am grateful to have this thoughtful and careful work, which in forging yet new ground in this comparative filed of Scottish-Irish studies, brings understudied authors into view and provides an important model for talking about class in contemporary literatures more generally."--James Joyce Literary Supplement