Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven Theology, and the Legacy of Jonathan Edwards by Douglas A. Sweeney

Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven Theology, and the Legacy of Jonathan Edwards

byDouglas A. Sweeney

Hardcover | October 15, 2002

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Nathaniel Taylor was arguably the most influential and the most frequently misrepresented American theologian of his generation. While he claimed to be an Edwardsian Calvinist, very few people believed him. This book attempts to understand how Taylor and his associates could have countedthemselves Edwardsians. In the process, it explores what it meant to be an Edwardsian minister and intellectual in the 19th century.

About The Author

Douglas A. Sweeney is at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School.
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Title:Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven Theology, and the Legacy of Jonathan EdwardsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 6.3 × 9.29 × 1.18 inPublished:October 15, 2002Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195154282

ISBN - 13:9780195154283

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"Sweeney focuses on Taylor's theology, which he knows inside-out and which he lays out in an articulate fashion...Taylor had a set of brains to marvel at, and Sweeney is at his best in explicating his vision. Sweeney also emphasizes, rightly, that Taylor thought of himself as carrying on thetradition of Edwards, and demonstrates at length not just the quality of Taylor's ideas but the way in which Taylor tried to think the tradition out of some of the troubles it had gotten itself into in its 75-year commentary on Edwards."--Books and Culture