National Identity in Eastern Germany: Inner Unification or Continued Separation?

Hardcover | March 1, 1998

byAndreas Staab

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On October 30, 1990, Germany was formally reunified through an extension of the legal, political, and economic structures of West Germany into the former German Democratic Republic. For East Germans this transformation has been a challenging process. Former values, orientations, and standards have been subject to severe scrutiny as reunification has affected virtually every area of life. Staab analyzes the development from the divided to the unified Germany and asks to what extent East Germans have adopted a national identity in line with that of the West Germans. He examines such identity markers as attitudes toward territory, economics, ethnicity, mass culture, and civic-political activity. Identifying a significant range of commonalities, he also finds striking features of mutually exclusive areas working to prevent a shared national identity. Scholars and other researchers dealing with German politics and contemporary history, political sociology, and nationalism will be interested in this book.

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From the Publisher

On October 30, 1990, Germany was formally reunified through an extension of the legal, political, and economic structures of West Germany into the former German Democratic Republic. For East Germans this transformation has been a challenging process. Former values, orientations, and standards have been subject to severe scrutiny as reu...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:192 pages, 8.14 × 5.06 × 0.2 inPublished:March 1, 1998Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:027596177X

ISBN - 13:9780275961770

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?Academic and public libraries will...wish to include this title in their circulating collection because it is one to be read through. It is appropriate for readers from upper-class high school students to adults.?-American Reference Books Annual