Nationalism: A Very Short Introduction: A Very Short Introduction

Paperback | September 26, 2005

bySteven Grosby

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This book examines the political and moral challenges that face the vast majority of human beings who consider themselves to be members of various nations. It explores nationality through the difficulties and conflicts that have arisen throughout history, and discusses nations and nationalismfrom social, philosophical, and anthropological perspectives. In this fascinating Very Short Introduction, Steven Grosby looks at the nation in history, the territorial element in nationality, and the complex ways nationality has co-existed with religion, and shows how closely linked the concept of nationalism is with being human.

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This book examines the political and moral challenges that face the vast majority of human beings who consider themselves to be members of various nations. It explores nationality through the difficulties and conflicts that have arisen throughout history, and discusses nations and nationalismfrom social, philosophical, and anthropologi...

Steven Grosby is Professor of Religion at Clemson University. His publications include: Biblical Ideas of Nationality: Ancient and Modern, The calling of Education: The Academic Ethic and Other Essays on Higher Education, and The Theory of Objective mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Culture.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:160 pages, 6.85 × 4.37 × 0.4 inPublished:September 26, 2005Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0192840983

ISBN - 13:9780192840981

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Table of Contents

List of illustrations1. The Problem2. What is a Nation?3. The Nation as a Social Relation4. Motherland, Fatherland and Homeland5. The Nation in History6. Whose God is Mightier?7. Human Divisiveness8. ConclusionReferencesFurther ReadingIndex