Nature, Change, and Agency in Aristotles Physics: A Philosophical Study by Sarah Waterlow

Nature, Change, and Agency in Aristotles Physics: A Philosophical Study

bySarah WaterlowAs told bySarah Waterlow

Paperback | April 30, 1999

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An investigation into Aristotle's metaphysics of nature as expounded in the Physics. It focuses in particular his conception of change, a concept which is shown to possess a unique metaphysical structure, with implications that should engage the attention of contemporary analysis. Firstpublished in hardback in 1982, the book is now available for the first time in paperback. 'A powerful and appealing explanatory scheme which succeeds on the whole in drawing together a great many seemingly disparate elements in the Physics into a neat unitary stucture.' Canadian Philosophical Review

About The Author

Sarah Waterlow is at University of Yale.

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Title:Nature, Change, and Agency in Aristotles Physics: A Philosophical StudyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:280 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.63 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198244827

ISBN - 13:9780198244820

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"Impressive...no student of the Physics could fail to enjoy and benefit from ÝWaterlow's¨ work."--ISIS"A challenging and rewarding book. Dr. Waterlow has tried with sympathy and imagination, but also with sharp critical insight, to understand what it really means to hold some of the beliefs that Aristotle held."--Ancient Philosophy"Remarkable for Ýits¨ attention to the deeper metaphysical themes underlying Aristotle's discussions of modality and change."--Philosophical Review"A powerful and appealing explanatory scheme which succeeds on the whole in drawing together a great many seemingly disparate elements in the Physics into a neat unitary structure.--Canadian Philosophical Reviews"It only remains to recommend that anyone who has an interest both in Aristotle and in argument read Ýthis book¨...carefully and attentively."--International Studies in Philosophy