Navigating Safety: Necessary Compromises and Trade-Offs - Theory and Practice by Ren AmalbertiNavigating Safety: Necessary Compromises and Trade-Offs - Theory and Practice by Ren Amalberti

Navigating Safety: Necessary Compromises and Trade-Offs - Theory and Practice

byRen Amalberti

Paperback | April 10, 2013

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Managing safety in a professional environment requires constant negotiation with other competitive dimensions of risk management (finances, market and political drivers, manpower and social crisis). This is obvious, although generally not said in safety manuals. The book provides a unique vision of how to best find these compromises, starting with lessons learnt from natural risk management by individuals, then applying them to the craftsman industry, complex industrial systems (civil aviation, nuclear energy) and public services (like transportation and medicine). It offers a unique, illustrated, easy to read and scientifically based set of original concepts and pragmatic methods to revisit safety management and adopt a successful system vision. As such, and with illustrations coming from many various fields (aviation, fishing, nuclear, oil, medicine), it potentially covers a broad readership.

Title:Navigating Safety: Necessary Compromises and Trade-Offs - Theory and PracticeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:132 pagesPublished:April 10, 2013Publisher:Springer-Verlag/Sci-Tech/TradeLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9400765487

ISBN - 13:9789400765481

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Table of Contents

Foreword

1 The demand for safety and its paradoxes

2 Human error at the centre of the debate on safety

3 The keys to a successful systemic approach to risk management

4 Human and organisational factors (HOFs): Significantly growing challenges

5 Conclusion: The golden rules in relation to systemic safety

Index