Necessary Roughness

Paperback | January 3, 1998

byMarie G. Lee

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Chan Kim has never felt like an outsider in his life. That is, not until his family moves from L.A. to a tiny town in Minnesota--Land of 10,000 Lakes--and probably 10,000 hicks,too. The Kims are the only Asian family in town, and when Chan and his twin sister, Young, attend high school, it's a blond-haired, blue-eyed whiteout.

Chan throws himself into the only game in town--football--and the necessary roughness required to make a player. On the field it means "justifiable violence," but as Chan is about to discover, off the field it's a whole different ballgame . . .Chan Jung Kim has always been popular. But that was when he lived in L.A. and was the star of his soccer team. Now his family’s moved—to a tiny town in Minnesota, where football’s the name of the game and nobody has ever seen an Asian American family before. Desperate to fit in, Chan throws himself into the game—but he feels like an outsider. For the first time in his life, he finds himself thinking about what it really means to be Korean—and what is really important. By turns gripping, painful, funny, and illuminating, Necessary Roughness introduces a major new talent and a fresh young voice to the Harper list.

1997 Best Books for the Teen Age (NY Public Library)
1998 Best Books for Young Adults (ALA)
Chan Jung Kim has always been popular. But that was when he lived in L.A. and was the star of his soccer team. Now his family’s moved—to a tiny town in Minnesota, where football’s the name of the game and nobody has ever seen an Asian American family before. Desperate to fit in, Chan throws himself into the game—but he feels like an outsider. For the first time in his life, he finds himself thinking about what it really means to be Korean—and what is really important. By turns gripping, painful, funny, and illuminating, Necessary Roughness introduces a major new talent and a fresh young voice to the Harper list.

1997 Best Books for the Teen Age (NY Public Library)
1998 Best Books for Young Adults (ALA)

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From Our Editors

Chan Kim discovers what it feels like to be an outsider when he and his family move from sunny Los Angeles to Minnesota. There in the land of 10,000 lakes, he and his sister find they are the only Asians in their blonde-haired, blue-eyed high school. That’s when he decides to take up football and all the roughness that goes along with ...

From the Publisher

Chan Kim has never felt like an outsider in his life. That is, not until his family moves from L.A. to a tiny town in Minnesota--Land of 10,000 Lakes--and probably 10,000 hicks,too. The Kims are the only Asian family in town, and when Chan and his twin sister, Young, attend high school, it's a blond-haired, blue-eyed whiteout.Chan th...

Marie G. Lee is a second-generation Korean American who was born and raised in Hibbing, Minnesota.Her books include If It Hadn't Been for Yoon Jun, Necessary Roughness, and Night of the Chupacabras.Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Kenyon Review, and several anthologies.She has appeared on PBS's "Asian American" and is a...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 6.75 × 4.19 × 0.6 inPublished:January 3, 1998Publisher:HarperCollins

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0064471691

ISBN - 13:9780064471695

Appropriate for ages: 3 - 5

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From Our Editors

Chan Kim discovers what it feels like to be an outsider when he and his family move from sunny Los Angeles to Minnesota. There in the land of 10,000 lakes, he and his sister find they are the only Asians in their blonde-haired, blue-eyed high school. That’s when he decides to take up football and all the roughness that goes along with it. Now he’s just got to learn that it’s justified on the field, but violent off it in Necessary Roughness.

Editorial Reviews

"An honest voice that ricochets between wild extravagance, bathroom scatology, and self-conscious poignancy." (The Horn Book)