Network Manager's Handbook

Paperback | October 11, 2002

byMuller

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IF A NETWORK MANAGER COULD HAVE ONLY ONE BOOK, THIS WOULD BE IT

Here are all the essential, nuts-and-bolts details network managers need to know, but won't find in any textbook.

REAL PLATFORMS - REAL PRODUCTS - REAL BUDGETS - REAL-WORLD SOLUTIONS

No other book covers life on the line with all the daily operations involved in running a business-scale network - and being a corporate officer at the same time -- like "Network Manager's Handbook.

While many other books talk about networking technologies, author Nathan Muller tackles the real make-or-break operations and procedures such as strategic planning, documentation, retrofitting, "managing up," and much more. This unique survival guide delves into everything you didn't learn in school but need to know, such as:
* Minimizing risk during procurements
* Calculating the "true cost"
* Downsizing
* Operating the Help Desk
* Asset identification
* Systems integration
* Network security
* Outsourcing
* Contingencyplanning

Muller provides the insights that only a veteran with real-world experience can offer, including:
* Why design is one-half the battle and implementation is the other
* Secrets of successful financial planning
* How to effectively negotiate service agreements
* The role of the communications department
* The most effective way to manage, evaluate, and schedule technical staff

"Network Manager's Handbook may well be the best career investment any IT professional can make.

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From the Publisher

IF A NETWORK MANAGER COULD HAVE ONLY ONE BOOK, THIS WOULD BE ITHere are all the essential, nuts-and-bolts details network managers need to know, but won't find in any textbook. REAL PLATFORMS - REAL PRODUCTS - REAL BUDGETS - REAL-WORLD SOLUTIONS No other book covers life on the line with all the daily operations involved in running a b...

From the Jacket

IF A NETWORK MANAGER COULD HAVE ONLY ONE BOOK, THIS WOULD BE ITHere are all the essential, nuts-and-bolts details network managers need to know, but won’t find in any textbook. REAL PLATFORMS • REAL PRODUCTS • REAL BUDGETS • REAL-WORLD SOLUTIONS No other book covers life on the line with all the daily operations involved in running a b...

Nathan J. Muller is an independent consultant specializing in advanced technology marketing, research, and education. He has more than 25 years of experience in the field, and previously held technical and marketing positions with General DataComm Industries, Planning Research Corp., and ITT Telecom. Mr. Muller is on the editorial boar...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:9.1 × 7.2 × 1.75 inPublished:October 11, 2002Publisher:McGraw-HillLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0071405674

ISBN - 13:9780071405676

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Table of Contents

ContentsPreface

Part 1 Assembling the Infrastructure

Chapter 1 Role of the Communications Department

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Network Planning and Design

1.2.1 Responsibilities

1.2.2 Alternatives to In-House Staff

1.3 Network Management

1.3.1 Fault Detection

1.3.2 Maintenance Tracking

1.3.3 Performance Measurement

1.3.4 Configuration Management

1.3.5 Applications Management

1.3.6 Security

1.3.7 Inventory and Accounting

1.4 Help Desk

1.5 Administration

1.5.1 Moves, Adds, and Changes

1.5.2 Software Distribution and License Management

1.5.3 Network Backup and Data Recovery

1.6 Record Keeping

1.7 Training

1.8 Technical Support

1.9 Operations Management

1.10 Importance of Staff Continuity

1.11 Role of the CIO

1.12 Conclusion

Chapter 2 The Procurement Process

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Managing Change

2.3 Organizational Objectives

2.4 Needs Assessment

2.5 Selecting Potential Vendors

2.5.1 Financial and Credit Information

2.5.2 Product Development

2.5.3 Integration and Engineering

2.5.4 Quality Control

2.5.5 Interoperability Testing

2.5.6 Repair and Return

2.5.7 Customer Service

2.5.8 Technical Documentation

2.5.9 Customer Training

2.5.10 Primary Line of Business

2.5.11 Vendor References

2.5.12 Escrow Protection

2.6 Select the Vendor

2.7 The Action Plan

2.8 Feedback

2.9 Coping with Change

2.9.1 Tracking New Technologies

2.9.2 Pursuing New Products and Services

2.9.3 Selling Soft-Dollar Benefits

2.9.4 Pilot Testing

2.9.5 High-Impact Activities

2.10 Conclusion

Chapter 3 Writing the Request for Proposal

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Needs Assessment

3.3 General Information

3.3.1 Purpose

3.3.2 Scope

3.3.3 Schedule of Events

3.4 Contract Terms and Conditions

3.4.1 Liabilities

3.4.2 Mechanical Clauses

3.4.3 Technical Specifications

3.4.4 Project Support

3.4.5 Costs and Charges

3.4.6 Reliability and Warranty

3.4.7 Maintenance

3.4.8 Product Delivery

3.4.9 Rights and Options

3.4.10 Relocation

3.5 Proposal Specifications

3.5.1 Letter of Transmittal

3.5.2 Proposal Format and Content

3.6 Technical Requirements

3.6.1 General Considerations

3.6.2 Equipment Specifications

3.6.3 Appendixes

3.7 RFP Alternatives

3.8 Conclusion

Chapter 4 Financial Planning

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Asset versus Expense Management

4.3 The Planning Process

4.3.1 Needs Assessment

4.3.2 Calculating True Costs

4.3.3 Time Value of Money

4.3.4 Discounted Cash Flow Analysis

4.3.5 Impacts on Cash Flow

4.3.6 Loan Amortization

4.4 Return on Investment

4.5 Procurement Alternatives

4.5.1 Cash Purchase

4.5.2 Installment Loan

4.5.3 Leasing

4.5.4 Types of Leases

4.6 Financial Management of Communications

4.7 Requirements for Strategic Operation

4.8 Opportunity Assessment

4.8.1 Cost Reporting

4.8.2 Budgeting and Control

4.8.3 Financial Operations

4.8.4 How to Start

4.9 Assessing Vendor Stability

4.9.1Debt/Equity Ratio (Total Debt/Total Equity)

4.10 Conclusion

Chapter 5 Managing, Evaluating, and Scheduling Technical Staff

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Structuring the Setting

5.2.1 Making Time

5.2.2 Ensuring Privacy

5.2.3 Physical Setting

5.3 Managing the Process

5.3.1 Comfort

5.3.2 Rapport

5.3.3 Trust

5.4 A Closer Look At Bridging Skills

5.4.1 Body Language

5.4.2 Mental Attention

5.4.3 Respect

5.4.4 Invitations

5.4.5 Acknowledgments

5.5 Integrating the Information

5.5.1 Reflection

5.5.2 Self-Disclosure

5.5.3 Immediacy

5.5.4 Probing

5.5.5 Checking

5.5.6 Confrontation

5.6 Support

5.6.1 Problem Definition

5.6.2 Problem Ownership

5.6.3 Developing Action Plans

5.7 Withdrawal

5.7.1 Centering

5.7.2 Appreciation

5.8 Why Bother?

5.9 Staff Expectations

5.10 Employee Evaluations

5.10.1 Reasons to Evaluate

5.10.2 Information Gathering

5.10.3 Common Traps

5.10.4 Review Methods

5.10.5 Computerized Evaluation Tools

5.11 Computerized Scheduling Tools

5.12 Conclusion

Chapter 6 Outsourcing Infrastructure

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Reasons to Outsource

6.3 Approaches to Outsourcing

6.4 Outsourcing Trends

6.5 What to Outsource

6.6 Typical Outsourcing Services

6.6.1 Moves, Adds, Changes

6.6.2 Systems and Network Integration

6.6.3 Project Management

6.6.4 Trouble Ticket Administration

6.6.5 Management of Vendor-Carrier Relations

6.6.6 Maintenance, Repair, and Replacement

6.6.7 Disaster Recovery

6.6.8 Technology Migration Planning

6.6.9 Training

6.6.10 Equipment Leasing

6.6.11 LAN Administration and Management

6.6.12 WAN Administration and Management

6.6.13 Network Security

6.6.14 Enterprise Applications

6.7 Decision to Outsource

6.8 Vendor Evaluation Criteria

6.9 Structuring the Relationship

6.10 Negotiations

6.11 Conclusion

Part 2 Organizing Technology Assets

Chapter 7 Downsizing and Distributing Information Resources

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Benefits of Downsizing

7.3 Opportunity Assessment

7.3.1 Senior Management Perspective

7.3.2 Systems Designer Perspective

7.3.3 Systems Developer Perspective

7.3.4 Systems Designers and Developers

7.3.5 IT Management Perspective

7.4 Making the Transition

7.5 Distributed Processing Environment

7.5.1 Dedicated Application Servers

7.5.2 Minicomputers

7.5.3 Super Servers

7.5.4 Server Clusters

7.5.5 Mainframes

7.5.6 Client-Server

7.5.7 Thin-Client Architecture

7.5.8 Cooperative Processing

7.5.9 Peer-to-Peer Data Sharing

7.6 Transition Aids

7.6.1 Working with Objects

7.6.2 Working with CASE Tools

7.6.3 Distributed Network Management

7.6.4 Role of SNMP

7.7 Organizational Issues

7.7.1 Mainframe Mindset

7.7.2 PC Mindset

7.7.3 Addressing the Soft Issues

7.8 Implementation

7.8.1 Success Factors

7.8.2 Risk Factors

7.8.3 Setting Objective Criteria

7.9 Assuming a Leadership Role

7.10 Collocation Arrangements

7.11 Conclusion

Chapter 8 Network Service and Facility Selection

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Transmission Media

8.2.1 Twisted-Pair Wiring

8.2.2 Coaxial Cable

8.2.3 Optical Fiber

8.2.4 Wireless Communications

8.2.5 Broadband Wireless

8.2.6 Satellite

8.2.7 Free-Space Laser

8.3 Analog Services and Lines

8.4 Digital Subscriber Line

8.5 T-Carrier Facilities

8.6 Centrex

8.7 ISDN

8.8 Packet Data Services

8.8.1 Internet Protocol

8.8.2 Frame Relay

8.8.3 Asynchronous Transfer Mode

8.9 Bundled Services

8.9.1 Bundle Examples

8.9.2 Decision Criteria

8.10 Conclusion

Chapter 9 Systems Integration

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Systems Integration Defined

9.3 Role of Business Process Reengineering

9.3.1 Predecision Services

9.3.2 Preinstallation Services

9.3.3 Installation and Implementation Services

9.3.4 Postinstallation Services

9.3.5 Life Cycle Services

9.4 Types of Integrators

9.4.1 Data Communications Service Providers

9.4.2 Consultants

9.4.3 Information Technology Shops

9.4.4 Traditional Service Firms

9.4.5 Equipment Vendors, Vars, Distributors

9.5 Evaluation Criteria

9.5.1 Technological Leadership

9.5.2 Digital Transport Systems

9.5.3 Network Design

9.5.4 Microwave and Fiber-Optic Interfacing

9.5.5 Network Management

9.5.6 Project Management

9.5.7 Facilities Engineering

9.5.8 Carrier Services and Pricing

9.5.9 Telco Practices and Procedures

9.5.10 Contemporary and Future Technologies

9.5.11 Project Pricing Considerations

9.6 Alternative Arrangements

9.7 Conclusion

Chapter 10 Help Desk Operations

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Help Desk Functions

10.3 Types of Help Desks

10.4 Help Desk Installation

10.5 Infrastructure Requirements

10.6 Operation

10.6.1 Remote Control Software

10.6.2 Security

10.7 Staffing

10.8 Staff Responsibilities

10.9 Help Desk Tools

10.10 Role of Expert Systems

10.10.1 Intelligent Text Retrieval

10.10.2 Case Based Reasoning

10.10.3 Rule Based Expert Systems

10.10.4 Neural Networks

10.11 Delivering Support Via the Internet

10.12 Outsourcing the Help Desk

10.13 NMS-Integrated Help Desks

10.14 Conclusion

Chapter 11 Network Integration

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Internetworking Devices

11.2.1 Bridges

11.2.2 Routers

11.2.3 Gateways

11.3 Methods of Integration

11.3.1 Translation

11.3.2 Encapsulation

11.3.3 Segmentation

11.3.4 Emulation

11.3.5 Speed Matching

11.4 Terminal Emulation

11.5 SNA-LAN Integration

11.5.1 Integration Issues

11.5.2 Integration Approaches

11.5.3 Advanced Solutions

11.6 Outsourcing Network Integration

11.7 Conclusion

Chapter 12 Navigating Service Level Agreements

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Enterprise SLAs

12.2.1 Performance Baselining

12.2.2 SLA Development Considerations

12.2.3 SLA Components

12.2.4 Service Level Enforcement

12.3 Service Provider SLAs

12.3.1 Performance Metrics

12.3.2 Sample SLA

12.3.3 SLA Tools

12.4 Types of SLAs

12.4.1 Internet SLA

12.4.2 Collocation Services

12.4.3 Shared Hosting SLA

12.4.4 Managed Hosting Services

12.4.5 Web-Enabled Call Centers

12.4.6 Managed Firewall Services

12.5 Issues to Consider

12.6 Conclusion

Chapter 13 Technology Asset Management

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Types of Assets

13.2.1 Hardware Assets

13.2.2 Software Assets

13.2.3 Web-Based Asset Management

13.2.4 Network Assets

13.2.5 Cable Assets

13.3 Methods of Implementation

13.3.1 Stand-Alone Applications

13.3.2 Help Desk

13.3.3 Network Management Systems

13.3.4 Third-Party Subscription Services

13.4 The Cost of Asset Management

13.5 Standards

13.5.1 Desktop Management Task Force

13.5.2 Plug and Play

13.6 Conclusion

Part 3 Keeping the Network Healthy

Chapter 14 Maintenance and Support Planning

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Service and Support offerings

14.3 In-House Approach

14.3.1 Staffing Requirements

14.3.2 User Support

14.3.3 Technical Support

14.3.4 Operations Management

14.4 Reporting Requirements

14.5 Equipment Requirements

14.5.1 Spares Inventory

14.5.2 Test Equipment

14.5.3 Technical References

14.6 Vendor and Carrier Services

14.7 Third-Party Maintenance Firms

14.8 Cooperative Arrangements

14.9 Cabling and Rewiring Considerations

14.9.1 Premises Wiring

14.9.2 Treating the Cable Plant as an Asset

14.9.3 Cable Planning

14.10 Other Planning Activities

14.11 Conclusion

Chapter 15 Network Monitoring and Testing

15.1 Introduction

15.2 Protocol Analyzers

15.2.1 Features

15.3 Breakout Boxes

15.4 Bit Error Rate Testers

15.5 Analog Line Impairment Testers

15.6 DSL Testing

15.7 T-Carrier Testing

15.8 ISDN Testing

15.8.1 Physical Link Problems

15.8.2 Data Link Problems

15.8.3 Network Layer Problems

15.9 Digital Data Service Testing

15.10 Testing Frame Relay Networks

15.11 X.25 Testing

15.12 Testing ATM Networks

15.13 Conclusion

Chapter 16 Network Management

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Network Management System Functions

16.2.1 Topology Mapping

16.2.2 Administration

16.2.3 Performance Measurement

16.2.4 Control and Diagnostics

16.2.5 Configuration Management

16.2.6 Applications Management

16.2.7 Security

16.3 Network Management System

16.3.1 Simple Network Management Protocol

16.3.2 Management Information Base

16.3.3 Network Manager

16.4 SNMP Integration

16.4.1 Intelligent Hubs

16.4.2 Carrier Services

16.5 Remote Monitoring Management Information Base

16.5.1 Advantages of RMON

16.5.2 Remote Monitoring Applications

16.5.3 Ethernet Object Groups

16.5.4 Token Ring Extensions

16.6 RMON II

16.7 Conclusion

Chapter 17 Network Design and Optimization

17.1 Introduction

17.2 Data Acquisition

17.3 Network Simulation

17.4 Bill of Materials

17.5 Network Drawing Tools

17.6 Drawing Techniques

17.6.1 Device Library

17.6.2 Template Usage

17.7 Embedded Intelligence

17.8 Bandwidth Optimization

17.8.1 Approaches

17.8.2 Traffic Shaping

17.8.3 Load Balancing

17.8.4 Caching

17.8.5 Client-Aware Acceleration

17.8.6 Queuing

17.8.7 Outsourcing Content Delivery

17.9 Optimization Issues

17.10 New Directions

17.10.1 Differentiated Services

17.10.2 Multiprotocol Label Switching

17.11 Selection Criteria

17.12 Conclusion

Chapter 18 Managing Technology Transitions

18.1 Introduction

18.2 The Transition Plan

18.3 Transition Methodology

18.3.1 Participative Planning

18.3.2 Education

18.3.3 Develop Solution Design

18.3.4 Evaluating Alternatives

18.3.5 Risk Assessment

18.3.6 Project Time Line

18.4 Role of Outsourcing

18.5 Role of Process Reorganization

18.6 Topology Considerations

18.6.1 Impact on Existing Networks

18.6.2 Impact on Existing Applications

18.6.3 Performance Measurement Tools

18.7 Support Issues

18.7.1 Systems Reliability

18.7.2 Systems Integration

18.7.3 Training

18.8 Management

18.9 Conclusion

Part 4 Protecting the Business

Chapter 19 Network Security

19.1 Introduction

19.2 Risk Assessment

19.2.1 Securing the Work Environment

19.2.2 Securing the Network

19.3 Access Controls

19.3.1 Password Security

19.3.2 Single Point Log-On

19.4 Other Security Measures

19.4.1 Key and Card Systems

19.4.2 Biometrics

19.4.3 Disk and Drive Controls

19.5 Data Encryption

19.5.1 Symmetric versus Asymmetric

19.5.2 Digital Encryption Standard

19.6 Virus Protection

19.7 Firewalls

19.8 Remote Access Security

19.8.1 Security Measures

19.8.2 Callback Security Systems

19.8.3 Link Level Protocols

19.9 Policy-Based Security

19.10 Security Planning

19.11 Conclusion

Chapter 20 Business Continuity Planning

20.1 Introduction

20.2 Planning Process

20.3 Staff Roles

20.3.1 Overall Responsibilities

20.3.2 Project Initiation and Management

20.3.3 Risk Evaluation and Control

20.3.4 Business Impact Analysis

20.3.5 Develop Business Recovery Strategies

20.3.6 Emergency Response

20.3.7 Awareness and Training Programs

20.3.8 Maintenance and Testing

20.3.9 Crisis Coordination

20.3.10 Coordination with Local Authorities

20.4 Security Risk Assessment

20.4.1 Layered Approach

20.4.2 Security Benchmarks

20.4.3 Security Information Resources

20.5 Outsourcing Business Continuity

20.5.1 Enterprise Solutions Providers

20.5.2 Telecommunications Carriers

20.5.3 Storage Service Providers

20.6 Training

20.7 Development Tools

20.8 Conclusion

Index