New England White

Kobo ebook | June 26, 2007

byStephen L. Carter

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Lemaster Carlyle, the president of the country's most prestigious university, and his wife, Julie, the divinity school's deputy dean, are America's most prominent and powerful African American couple. Driving home through a swirling blizzard late one night, the couple skids off the road. Near the sight of their accident they discover a dead body. To her horror, Julia recognizes the body as a prominent academic and one of her former lovers. In the wake of the death, the icy veneer of their town Elm Harbor, a place Julie calls "the heart of whiteness," begins to crack, having devastating consequences for a prominent local family and sending shock waves all the way to the White House.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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From the Publisher

Lemaster Carlyle, the president of the country's most prestigious university, and his wife, Julie, the divinity school's deputy dean, are America's most prominent and powerful African American couple. Driving home through a swirling blizzard late one night, the couple skids off the road. Near the sight of their accident they discover a...

Format:Kobo ebookPublished:June 26, 2007Publisher:Knopf Doubleday Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0307266966

ISBN - 13:9780307266965

Customer Reviews of New England White

Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from Predictable & pretentious I bought this book after reading the cover description. At first, I really liked the way the author wrote with such detail. Towards the middle, though, I became frustrated with the characters and their classist, pretentious behaviour. I didn't care that the wife/mother drove a Cadillac Escalade or that her mother drove a Lincoln Navigator, but these kinds of details were repeated and added nothing to the story. The family was wealthy and had done well for themselves, but these facts didn't lend themselves to enriching the story in any way. The storyline was predictable, and I knew who the responsible party was, well before it was revealed. The path leading you to that point would have been intriguing had the author left out all these details about the family's wealthy background. I found myself turning the pages, wanting to get it over with.
Date published: 2009-11-10