New Essays On Daisy Miller And The Turn Of The Screw by Vivian R. PollakNew Essays On Daisy Miller And The Turn Of The Screw by Vivian R. Pollak

New Essays On Daisy Miller And The Turn Of The Screw

EditorVivian R. Pollak

Paperback | November 26, 1993

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Daisy Miller and The Turn of the Screw may be Henry James's most widely read tales. Certainly, these swiftly moving accounts of failed connections are among the best examples of his shorter fiction. One represents the international theme that made him famous; the other exemplifies the multiple meanings that make him modern. The introduction to this 1993 volume locates his fiction in the context of the family that conditioned his concern with the sexual politics of intimate experience. In the four essays that follow, Kenneth Graham offers a close reading of Daisy with an emphasis on Daisy; Robert Weisbuch examines Winterbourne as a specimen of James's formidable bachelor type; Millicent Bell places the ghost story governess in the traditions of English fiction and society; David McWhirter then provides a critique of female authority. Deftly summarising earlier criticism, these essays demonstrate the continuing appeal of Henry James in our time.
Title:New Essays On Daisy Miller And The Turn Of The ScrewFormat:PaperbackDimensions:166 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.39 inPublished:November 26, 1993Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521426812

ISBN - 13:9780521426817

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Table of Contents

Series editor's preface; A note on the text; 1. Introduction Vivian R. Pollak; 2. Daisy Miller: dynamics of an enigma Kenneth Graham; 3. Winterbourne and the doom of manhood in Daisy Miller Robert Weisbuch; 4. Class, sex, and the Victorian governess: James's The Turn of the Screw Millicent Bell; 5. The 'other house' of fiction: writing, authority, and femininity in The Turn of the Screw David McWhirter; Notes on contributors; Selected bibliography.

From Our Editors

Daisy Miller and The Turn of the Screw may be Henry James's most widely read tales. Certainly, these swiftly moving accounts of failed connections are among the best examples of his shorter fiction. In the four essays that follow, Kenneth Graham offers a close reading of Daisy that emphasizes the heroine's unknowability; Robert Weisbuch examines Winterbourne as a specimen of James's formidable bachelor type; Millicent Bell places the ghost story governess in the traditions of English fiction and society; and David McWhirter provides a critique of female authority.