New Essays on Go Down, Moses by Linda Wagner-MartinNew Essays on Go Down, Moses by Linda Wagner-Martin

New Essays on Go Down, Moses

EditorLinda Wagner-Martin

Paperback | June 13, 1996

Pricing and Purchase Info

$64.41

Earn 322 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Go Down, Moses (1942) came to fruition during the second world war and was written during one of Faulkner's most traumatic periods, yet it has fallen to critical neglect amid the vast scholarship on the great Southern writer. In part, this collection aims to tilt the balance, forcing the reader beyond critical commonplaces through asking challenging questions. The five essays assembled here explore the tensions of race and gender apparent throughout the novel.
Title:New Essays on Go Down, MosesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:172 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.39 inPublished:June 13, 1996Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521456096

ISBN - 13:9780521456098

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of New Essays on Go Down, Moses

Reviews

Table of Contents

1. Introduction Linda Wagner-Martin; 2. Touching race in Go Down, Moses John T. Matthews; 3. Go Down, Moses and the discourse of environmentalism Judith Bryant Wittenberg; 4. Her shape, his hand: the spaces of African American women in Go Down, Moses Minrose Gwin; 5. Who wears the mask? memory, desire, and race in Go Down, Moses Judith L. Sensibar; 6. The game of courts: Go Down, Moses, arbitrary legalities, and compensatory boundaries Thadious M. Davis.

From Our Editors

Go Down, Moses (1942) came to fruition during World War II, was written during one of Faulkner's most traumatic periods, and has fallen into critical neglect amid the vast scholarship on the great southern writer. In part, this collection aims to tilt the balance, forcing the reader beyond the critical commonplaces through asking challenging questions. The five essays assembled here explore the tensions of race and gender apparent throughout the novel. Judith Sensibar approaches the work through Faulkner's relationship with Caroline Barr, the black woman who was his primary caretaker in life; Judith Wittenberg offers an ecological reading, setting the work firmly within its chronological age; John T. Matthews redefines the novel as a "southern" experience; Minrose Gwin focuses on the spaces in the text occupied by black women characters; and Thadious M. Davis charts further complications of the black/white relationships that lie at the heart of the novel.