New Mexico's Reptiles and Amphibians: A Field Guide by R. D. BartlettNew Mexico's Reptiles and Amphibians: A Field Guide by R. D. Bartlett

New Mexico's Reptiles and Amphibians: A Field Guide

byR. D. Bartlett, Patricia P. Bartlett

Paperback | October 1, 2013

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New Mexico is home to 165 species and subspecies of snakes, lizards, turtles, frogs, toads, and salamanders. Some are ubiquitous and others are localized. If you want basic and reliable information on the lizard in your backyard or the snake you encountered on a hike in the mountains, this handy field guide is invaluable. Both complete and concise, it includes species accounts, maps, photographs, and black-and-white drawings to help you identify the species you have encountered. In addition to basic taxonomy and a glossary, the authors have included suggestions on field protocol and legalities, as well as useful information about the various herpetofauna habitats in the state.

R. D. Bartlett and Patricia P. Bartlett are the authors of over fifty books on reptiles and amphibians, including Guide and Reference to the Amphibians of Western North America (North of Mexico) and Hawaii.
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Title:New Mexico's Reptiles and Amphibians: A Field GuideFormat:PaperbackDimensions:360 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.85 inPublished:October 1, 2013Publisher:University Of New Mexico PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0826352073

ISBN - 13:9780826352071

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"New Mexico has a rich diversity of native (and introduced) herpetofauna. Well crafted and concise, this book is a valuable tool for identifying and learning about these magnificent animals. Whether a part of the home library or as an essential part of your field gear, this book is a 'must have' for anyone with an interest in New Mexico's herptiles!"
--Douglas L. Hotle, curator of herpetology Albuquerque BioPark