New Political Spaces in Latin American Natural Resource Governance

Hardcover | October 16, 2012

EditorHåvard Haarstad

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New Political Spaces in Latin American Natural Resource Governance takes a new look at an essential theme for Latin America's social and economic development: how natural resources are governed and struggled over. It questions the idea that the governance now can be characterized as 'post-neoliberal' and illustrates the enduring constraints on democratic and 'just' resource extraction. Case studies written by anthropologists, geographers, political scientists, and sociologists provide empirical detail and analytical insight into states' and communities' relations to natural resource sectors, and show how resource dependencies continue to shape their political spaces.

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New Political Spaces in Latin American Natural Resource Governance takes a new look at an essential theme for Latin America's social and economic development: how natural resources are governed and struggled over. It questions the idea that the governance now can be characterized as 'post-neoliberal' and illustrates the enduring constr...

Håvard Haarstad is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Geography, University of Bergen, Norway. His current research concerns the political economy of natural resources in Latin America and elsewhere.

other books by Håvard Haarstad

Format:HardcoverDimensions:278 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.69 inPublished:October 16, 2012Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230340709

ISBN - 13:9780230340701

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Table of Contents

1. Extracting Justice? Critical Themes and Challenges in Latin American Natural Resource Governance; H.Haarstad
2. Post-what? Extractive Industries, Narratives of Development and Socio-environmental Disputes Across the (Ostensibly Changing) Andean Region; D.Humphreys Bebbington & A.Bebbington
3. More than Beads and Feathers: Resource Extraction and the Indigenous Challenge in Latin America; J.A.McNeish
4. REDD Gold in Latin America: Blessing or Curse?; A.Hall
5. Extraction, Regional Integration and the Enduring Problem of Local Political Spaces; H.Haarstad & C.Campero
6. Resource Extraction and Local Justice in Chile: Conflicts over the Commodification of Spaces and the Sustainable Development of Places; J.Barton, Á.Román & A.Fløysand
7. Territorializing Resource Conflicts in 'Post-neoliberal' Bolivia: Hydrocarbon Development and Indigenous Land Titling in TCO Itika Guasu; P.Anthias
8. The Governing of Extraction, Oil Enclaves and Indigenous Responses in the Ecuadorian Amazon; M.A.Guzmán-Gallegos
9. Oil Spills, Contamination and Unruly Engagements with Indigenous Peoples in the Peruvian Amazon; T.Okamoto & E.Leifsen
10. Non-extractive Policies as a Path to Environmental Justice? The Case of the Yasuní Park in Ecuador; C.Certomà & L.Greyl
11. Extraction as a Space of Social Justice? Commodity Production and Labor Rights in Brazil and Chile; J.T.Nem Singh

Editorial Reviews

"A superb, genuinely interdisciplinary collection of essays underpinned by a commitment to social justice, this book offers a set of rigorous, theoretically-informed studies of governance within the vital natural resource sector in Latin America and makes a genuine contribution to debates about the Left and post-neoliberalism in the region. Very highly recommended indeed." - Jean Grugel, professor of International Development, University of Sheffield'This book is a welcome addition to research on how social conflicts that arise from natural resource policies can be mitigated or avoided. With case studies from oil to post-neoliberalism, it provides an engaging and thought-provoking approach to the relationship between natural resources and socio-economic development in the region." - David J. Keeling, department head and professor of Geography, Western Kentucky University