The New Rhetoric: A Treatise On Argumentation by Chaim PerelmanThe New Rhetoric: A Treatise On Argumentation by Chaim Perelman

The New Rhetoric: A Treatise On Argumentation

byChaim Perelman, Charles Perelman

Paperback

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Chaïm Perelman (1912–1984), a Polish-born philosopher of law, studied, taught, and lived most of his life in Brussels. He became the youngest full professor in the history of the Université Libre de Bruxelles, where he remained for the rest of his career. He was among the most important argumentation theorists of the twentieth century. The New Rhetoric: A Treatise on Argumentation, written with Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca in 1958, and translated into English by John Wilkinson and Purcell Weaver in 1969, is his chief work. He is also the author of The Realm of Rhetoric (University of Notre Dame Press, 1982).

(L. is for Lucie) L. Olbrechts-Tyteca (1899–1987) was a Belgian academic and longtime co-worker of Chaïm Perelman. She volunteered in 1948 to support Perelman's work and developed several aspects of the New Rhetoric independently in later years.
Chaïm Perelman (1912–1984), a Polish-born philosopher of law, studied, taught, and lived most of his life in Brussels. He became the youngest full professor in the history of the Université Libre de Bruxelles, where he remained for the rest of his career. He was among the most important argumentation theorists of the twentieth century....
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Title:The New Rhetoric: A Treatise On ArgumentationFormat:PaperbackDimensions:576 pages, 8.9 × 6 × 1.3 inPublisher:University of Notre Dame Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0268004463

ISBN - 13:9780268004460

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Editorial Reviews

"An important book, which should initiate re-estimation of the importance of a liberal art central to antiquity and the Renaissance, latterly eclipsed by the . . . logic of science and mathematics. . . . Dealing primarily with the written word, the authors analyze the constant and the variables in all argumentation, whether addressed to a universal audience or to one's self. Perelman claims that this work marks a break with a concept of reason which has dominated Western thought for three centuries. In 550 pages, he makes a good case for the claim." —The Key Reporter, Autumn 1970