New Treaty, New Tradition: Reconciling New Zealand and Maori Law by Carwyn JonesNew Treaty, New Tradition: Reconciling New Zealand and Maori Law by Carwyn Jones

New Treaty, New Tradition: Reconciling New Zealand and Maori Law

byCarwyn Jones

Paperback | February 15, 2017

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While Indigenous peoples face the challenges of self-determination in a postcolonial world, New Treaty, New Tradition provides a timely look at how the resolution of land claims in New Zealand continues to shape Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures alike. As Canada moves towards reconciliation with its own First Peoples, we can learn much from the Waitangi Treaty example.

Legal cultures change in response to social and economic environments. Inevitably, the settlement of historical land claims has affected issues of identity, rights, and resource management. Interweaving thoughtful analysis with Māori storytelling on legal themes, Carwyn Jones shows how the New Zealand treaty settlement process limits Indigenous authority. At the same time, the author reveals the enduring vitality of Māori legal traditions, making the case that genuine reconciliation can occur only when we recognize the importance of Indigenous traditions in the settlement process.

Drawing on examples from Canada and New Zealand, Jones illustrates how Western legal thought has shaped the claims process, deepening our understanding of treaty work in the former British colonies and providing context for similar work in Canada. As Indigenous self-determination plays out on the world stage, this nuanced reflection brings into focus prospects for the long-term success of reconciliation projects around the globe.

Carwyn Jones is a senior lecturer in the Faculty of Law at Victoria University of Wellington.Carwyn Jones is a senior lecturer in the Faculty of Law at Victoria University of Wellington and a New Zealand Maori of Ngati Kahungunu descent. His primary research interests relate to the Treaty of Waitangi and Indigenous legal traditions. He...
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Title:New Treaty, New Tradition: Reconciling New Zealand and Maori LawFormat:PaperbackDimensions:232 pages, 8.94 × 6 × 0.55 inPublished:February 15, 2017Publisher:Ubc PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0774831693

ISBN - 13:9780774831697

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Table of Contents

1 Tino Rangatiratanga and Māori Legal History

2 Reconciling Legal Systems

3 Māori Law Today

4 Treaty Settlements and Māori Law

5 Post-Settlement Governance and Māori Law

6 New Stories and Old Stories Re-Told

Epilogue: Māui and The People Of The North

Pinepine te Kura

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Editorial Reviews

Legal traditions respond to social and economic environments. Māori author and legal scholar Carwyn Jones provides a timely examination of how the resolution of land claims in New Zealand has affected Māori law and the challenges faced by Indigenous peoples as they attempt to exercise self-determination in a postcolonial world. Combining thoughtful analysis with Māori storytelling, Jones’s nuanced reflections on the claims process show how Western legal thought has shaped treaty negotiations. Drawing on Canadian and international examples, Jones makes the case that genuine reconciliation can occur only when we recognize the importance of Indigenous traditions in the settlement process.New Treaty, New Tradition is a tour de force. Intricately argued and beautifully sculpted, this book is useful to both scholars and Indigenous peoples around the world engaged in treaty and resource recovery negotiations. - Margaret Mutu, author of The State of Māori Rights