Nibble & Kuhn: A Novel by David Schmahmann

Nibble & Kuhn: A Novel

byDavid Schmahmann

Kobo ebook | November 1, 2009

Pricing and Purchase Info

$19.19 online 
$23.99 list price save 20%

Available for download

Not available in stores

about

A young lawyer in a pretentious law firm loves a girl that he can't have and is forced to try a major case that he can't win, and must do both under the critical scrutiny of senior lawyers who will soon decide whether to promote him to partnership.
Title:Nibble & Kuhn: A NovelFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:November 1, 2009Publisher:Chicago Review PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0897339584

ISBN - 13:9780897339582

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Nibble & Kuhn: A Novel

Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from Romance, not courtroom drama This book isn't my usual type of book I normally read. I gave it a chance anyway because I thought the case was interesting. The case being, the wrongful deaths of several children who contracted cancer as a result of a chemical plant nearby and dumping their waste materials into the water. I thought something like this would bring a lot of intrigue and a lot of plotting within a very cut throat law firm. I was completely wrong. It wasn't much like that. It was a quiet drama, with a satirical view of a prominent law firm which seems to be going downhill for several years. I liked the satire, it was under the main character's narration and point of view (Derek Dover) and it was nice to read. You can hear the irony in his narration and how he takes a few jabs here and there about the firm. (With a firm called Nibble and Kuhn there's bound to be a lot of jokes with that name). The way the story was written was clear and crisp. Straight to the point most of the time and it seemed like a quick read. Although it wasn't what I expected it to be, it took me longer than usual to finish this novel because it didn't have the intrigue I wanted it to have or the seriousness. (Perhaps I watch too much Law and Order) As I progressed through the book more, I found myself really disliking Maria and Derek. For two grown up laywers, they act and behave like silly children. Maria, because with her personality, she had the backbone and the guts to tell her parents she's in love with Derek, instead she sucks it in and continues being with her fiance - yet persists being with Derek. Derek could have just let her go with her fiance but that's just too hard now is it? I felt myself rolling my eyes as more than half of the book was about their relationship, how they're trying to conceal it from the firm (why? I don't know..is it taboo to date within the law firm?) I saw these two grown adults just act like pathetic kids and I found myself having to force myself to read through it and wishing there was more about the case than about stupid Maria and Derek's relationship. To my disappointment, you don't read much about the case in great detail until way at the end, and even then it felt rushed and lacking. It seems Derek was just too obsessed with Maria to even care and just skipped the details and just talked about the case in about a two or three chapters and that's it. That frustrated me as I picked this book up to read about the case, not about their silly romance and the office politics (which was interesting to read, but it got old fast). The book got boring fast, after a while, Derek's story about the office, and about Maria and less on the case made me want to put the book aside and read other things. I really had to force myself to read the last one hundred pages. Now mind you, if you're into satire, and a "light" read with no heavy trial or heavy drama this might be the book for you. Otherwise, it's really not for me and not my sort of thing. I was really more into the case and nothing but. Overall, I was disappointed and wished it centered around the case and not about Maria and Derek. Pick this up if you want a light courtroom romance drama. Otherwise steer clear of it if you're into heavier stuff like I am.
Date published: 2009-12-17