No Good Deed by Kara ConnollyNo Good Deed by Kara Connolly

No Good Deed

byKara Connolly

Hardcover | July 18, 2017

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"[A] clever girl-power take on the Robin Hood legend."-The Buffalo News

Fans of Meagan Spooner's Hunted and CJ Redwine will love this reimagining of the legend of Robin Hood. Girl power rules supreme when a modern girl finds herself in the middle of a medieval mess with only her smart mouth and her Olympic-archer aim to get her home.


   Ellie Hudson is the front-runner on the road to gold for the U.S. Olympic archery team. All she has to do is qualify at the trials in jolly old England. When Ellie makes some kind of crazy wrong turn in the caverns under Nottingham Castle—yes, that Nottingham—she ends up in medieval England.
   Ellie doesn’t care how she got to the Middle Ages; she just wants to go home before she gets the plague. But people are suffering in Nottingham, and Ellie has the skills to make it better. What’s an ace archer to do while she’s stuck in Sherwood Forest but make like Robin Hood?
   Pulled into a past life as an outlaw, Ellie feels her present fading away next to daring do-gooding and a devilishly handsome knight. Only, Ellie is on the brink of rewriting history, and when she picks up her bow and arrow, her next shot could save her past—or doom civilization’s future.

"A rollicking time travel adventure that will sweep you away to the forest of Nottingham. Be prepared for surprises around every corner and a stubborn, strong-willed heroine you'll root for from the moment she picks up her bow!”-Colleen Houck, New York Times bestselling author of the Reawakened series and the Tiger’s Curse series

"This cheeky take on the Robin Hood legend is pure fun. Connolly’s swashbuckling debut will satisfy any adventure fans."-Booklist

"This fresh take on the Robin Hood mythology...is well worth it."-Publishers Weekly

"Fans will enjoy Ellie’s escapades as she runs around Sherwood Forest, bumping into bad guys, and teens interested in historical fiction with a generous mix of action/adventure will appreciate this page-turner....[Hand to readers of] Renée Ahdieh’s The Wrath & the Dawn series, David Almond’s A Song for Ella Grey, and Scott Lynch’s The Lies of Locke Lamora."-SLJ

"An appealing mix of tough and vulnerable...humor and complexity...make this absorbing time travel tale a refreshing change of pace."-Bulletin
Kara Connolly loves history, though she has never time traveled. She lives and writes in Arlington, Texas.   To learn more about Kara and her books, visit karaconnolly.wordpress.com or follow @readKaraC on Twitter and @readkaraconnolly on Instagram.
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Title:No Good DeedFormat:HardcoverDimensions:352 pages, 8.56 × 5.88 × 1.19 inPublished:July 18, 2017Publisher:Random House Children's BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0385743939

ISBN - 13:9780385743938

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Yep, it's another retelling Re-tellings. The latest fad. While they can be successfully pulled off, so long as the world is drastically different (ie: Lunar Chronicles), it's awfully hard to do well. This re-telling of Robin Hood has some great little anecdotes and moments; but for the most part it feels like recycled scenes, characters and concepts. Right down to the time travelling aspect. While there is action, intrigue, teeny bit of romance and all the things that generally make up a good story; I just couldn't help but feel like I'd read this book before or at the very least seen the movie. Now I know the scene of Robin Hood having a battle with staffs over the river is a classic moment in lots of Robin Hood lore and/or stories. However, the reality is that all I could imagine during this scenes description was the scene from Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. Now maybe it's not fair as I've seen that movie almost 100 times in my life (it was my Mom's favourite movie when I was a kid; and while we couldn't watch Simpsons or other shows on TV apparently violent movies were okay...). I suppose I'm bound to imagine similar moments in any Robin Hood story to scenes from the movie... even still it would have been nice for something interesting and different to have been thrown in the mix. As with any retellings Kara Connolly choses to focus on a couple of things and drop out other things. There is no Maid Marion (but is a Templar knight that our main gal is blown away by every time he dons his armour) or damsels in distress (unless our lead gal counts). Given that our gal is Robin Hood I suppose it was too much to hope for a lesbian romance. But we do get Little John, Will Scarlett, Alan Dale and (sort of) Friar Tuck. The characters themselves are not well fleshed out, but most of us don't need them to be as we know the players. The most disappointing character of all for me was the Sheriff of Nottingham. I adore this character usually but here it felt like he was far less important that others in Nottingham. It's almost like Connolly's story was too vanilla for the sheriff's black and morbid personality. The basic plot Like any good time travel story, girl is plunged into medieval times (luckily she's an amazing archer), screws a bunch of stuff up, concerns herself with trying to survive and get home; whilst not changing history... there's really not a lot else to say here except that I am really tired of reading time travel books where the character has to "fulfill" some task or event in order for the door to open back home. Let's not kid ourselves, this is a cheap, easy way for the author to write their way into a perfect ending at the perfect moment. I'd rather it be elaborate, magical or scientific. Pretty much anything but convenient would have been better. So are you wondering why I gave this three stars yet, given that I seem to have rolled my eyes at a lot of it and didn't really enjoy it? (lol) The ending. In any 'fairy tale' I'm a sucker for a good ending (not necessarily happy I'd like to point out). No Good Deed ends in a way I was not really expecting. Connolly takes what could have been a super mushy, annoying and overly romantic ending and makes it just... well perfect. It's plausible, cute and lovely all at once. So, is the ending worth the read? Not really. If you love Robin Hood then maybe. Perhaps a tween or pre-teen would love this but it's not even really a teen book (even though it's classified as young adult). In my opinion, you could read this to an 8 year old and honestly it would be less violent and offensive than most saturday morning cartoons. Overall you're not missing anything if you skip this one. I'm sure there will be dozens more re-tellings just like it tomorrow. Please note: I received an eARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. This is an honest and unbiased review.
Date published: 2017-08-18
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Low Action, really didn't get into it This book was half and half for me. It's rating on here is a 3 stars but in my mind. It is between 2.5 stars to 3 stars. It starts off with Ellie, she in the nationals of archery and if she wins. Then things happened and she is pulled into the medieval era time. Does that get exampled? no it doesn't. The next thing was there was no romance bits within this novel at all. None! Overall, i didn't fully like the book nor did i like the book. Would i recommend this book to anyone? Teens from 12 to 15 years of age and ones that love archery.
Date published: 2017-08-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fast and Fun Times in Sherwood Forest No Good Deed was an all around fun story. It was a surprise read as I hadn't planned on it but I'm really glad I did. The book transported me into another realm with delightful characters and subtle humour. I really enjoyed the Robin Hood retelling aspect. I'm not a fan of the English legend so I don't know the details of it but I loved the Sherwood Forest setting and how the author was able to mix it up with a present day heroine. I could only see a faint parallel of the other characters but it did not deter me from enjoying the story. They were all so much fun to spend time with. It's such a pleasure to follow Ellie into the past. So many times I wanted to laugh out loud at her. She gave off such an easy-going vibe with her hilarious thoughts and clueless remarks. It was impossible to ignore her- a born leader. I loved her interactions with the other characters especially Guilbert. They had a good rivalry ;) There isn't really a romance in this Robin Hood retelling. There were mutual good feelings but Ms. Connolly doesn't go into depth exploring any of them. I usually prefer books with romance (even the slightest bit would do) but I was surprisingly fine with the lack of it in this story. The focus was on Ellie's adventures which I thoroughly enjoyed. The ending to No Good Deed was one I wasn't expecting but fully appreciated. What Ellie worried most about actually worked in her favour. I'd say her trip through time was well worth the trouble and emotional toll. Readers who like a fast-paced story with real action and hilarious escapades should not miss out on the fun that is No Good Deed!
Date published: 2017-07-28

Read from the Book

Chapter OneTime stretched with the draw of my bow. Ancient ages whispered in the slide of the arrow on the rest, and all possibilities collected in that suspended instant when my breath slowed, my knuckle kissed the corner of my mouth, I loosed the shot—­And someone’s cell phone went off in the spectator stands.I got the shot off, but the bowstring smacked my arm above the guard. The sting ran all the way up to behind my eyes. I did a little it-­hurts-­but-­I-­can’t-curse dance but recovered quickly because, one, I did the same thing a couple of times a week, and two, Dr. Hudson’s Third Law of Competition Dynamics was “Never let them see you lose your cool.”Maybe Dad didn’t put it quite that way, but it was what he meant. So I put my game face on and ignored the troubling fact that I’d let a cell phone distract me amid all the general tweeting and pinging and hubbub.God, Ellie. Just because everyone’s watching to see when you crack . . .Even before I peered through the scope set up beside me, I knew it was a poor shot. But it was good enough that I could recover with a high-­scoring arrow and make it to the medal round.Hudson’s Second Law of Competition Dynamics was “There is no such thing as good enough.” There’s ten points and there’s try harder.With the Olympic qualifying trials coming up, and as the second-­highest-­ranked woman in the United States, fifth or sixth internationally, it was time to make my move up the rungs of the competitive ladder. That was what I was supposed to be doing in Nottingham. Not shooting like a reasonably accomplished summer camp counselor.But then, Rob was supposed to be here, not his alternate.Focus.That was Dr. Hudson’s First Law. Its corollary was “Stay in the moment.” Don’t think about the last shot, or the next shot, only about this shot.One arrow left in my quiver and two minutes on the clock. I took my time fitting the nock to the string, trying to narrow the prismatic scatter of my thoughts. I visualized myself on the podium, the way the team sports psychiatrist had suggested. But what my brain called up was Rob and me on the stand, the way the U.S. Archery Team had run our picture after my first national medal.Crap. Instead of slowing its roll, my head game was about to go off the rails. I mentally swiped the image of Rob and me off the screen and zoomed in on the ten-­point X in the middle of the target. Just that. No flags and no nations, no babel of languages from officials and spectators. I focused until everything blurred except me and the target—­And the bizarrely dressed man between us.“Hold!” I shouted, lowering my bow and slacking the string. Years of safety standards kicked in before I fully processed what I’d seen. “Man downrange!”The firing captain echoed my shout in three languages, and all the archers on the shooting line immediately complied. A confused murmur rippled through the spectators, and when I blinked myself back to the larger picture, I saw why. There was nothing between me and the targets, stretched out like a row of unblinking eyes.The officials conferred on their headsets, checking that the range was clear. The delay wasn’t long, but I could feel the murmur of annoyance trickling through the shooters.Finally the firing captain gestured for me to come off the line to talk to him—­pretty much the equivalent of getting called into the principal’s office. As I stepped away from my spot, the North Korean girl shooting next to me—­my major competition for the podium—­made a comment as I passed. It needed no translation.Before the official could reach me, Coach jogged over, with a look of serious concern. “What happened, Ellie?”I had my bow in one hand, and I spread the other in a palm-­up shrug. “There was someone downrange.”Coach had brought Olympic medalists and world champions to the podium before. My brother was one of them. Coach was almost family. “Was it an official? A spectator?” he asked.Honesty made me pause. “I’m not sure.” Safety had been drilled into me from my first archery lesson, and I knew calling a halt was the right thing to do, but I hadn’t really processed what or who I’d seen. I couldn’t even be sure if it was a man or a woman. I had the impression of a light-­colored dress or robe, like a costume. But I wasn’t about to say that, because that was just plain weird and I didn’t want to end up seeing a real psychiatrist. “I only saw him for a second, and then I yelled, and by the time I did that, he was gone.”When the line captain reached us, we had almost the exact same conversation, except in French. After I explained, he still looked doubtful but got on the radio and instructed security to watch for someone dressed in light-­colored clothes. Then he had the field captain signal for shooting to begin again.“Hey!” I protested. “I’m not on the line yet.”“Then I suggest you get there, Mademoiselle Hudson,” the official said flatly, “instead of distracting your competitors with this delay.”He left, and I spun to face Coach and vent my indignation. “What was I supposed to do? Keep quiet and hope this figment of my imagination didn’t get hit with an imaginary arrow?”Coach made a calming gesture. “Ellie, this isn’t important. You’re wasting shooting time.”“Not important?” I flapped a hand toward the French official. “I just got called off the line for doing the right thing! How is that not important?”“Arguing about it isn’t important,” he said before physically turning me around and adding, “The time warning is flashing.”It was, and I was still behind the ready line. It was bad sportsmanship to step up while my neighbor from North Korea was at full draw, so I had to watch the time count down while she held her shot much longer than necessary. She played a good head game, cranking up the pressure. Then, before she let loose, the woman to my right lifted her bow, holding me back another precious few seconds.She loosed with six seconds on the clock. All the other shooters were finished, so I leapt to the line with my arrow already in my hand.Five.I fitted the arrow’s nock to the string.Four.I put my eye on the target and lifted my bow.Three.I brought the bow down and drew back in the same motion.Two.My knuckle touched the corner of my mouth.One.I let fly.The scores took forever for the target captain to tally, and I sweated it out on the field, where only shooters and coaches were allowed, unable to face my parents until I knew whether I’d screwed up or really screwed up.By the time I got the news and went back to the field house, a lot of the women had already left, but the men were getting ready to shoot their qualifying rounds. Marco Canales paused in his stretching to give me some good-­natured hell. “Real dramatic, Ellie. Auditioning for a movie?”“Courting the cameras, more like.” Erik Murray didn’t look up from adjusting the stabilizer on his bow. “The video is probably already on your fan page.”I pulled off the sweaty headband keeping my shortish hair out of my face and shot Marco a “very droll” look. I ignored Erik Murray. He was something like nineteen going on a hundred and fifty; his younger brother had to set up his Facebook page. The thing is, my unofficial fan page was a little embarrassing, but Mom and I tacitly supported it with exclusive videos and interviews because the moderators donated any ad revenue to the Women’s Sports Foundation.Someone threw their arm around my neck. I jumped, but settled down when I saw the red, white, and blue manicure. Angela Torres was my closest friend on the team, as well as my closest competition. She was six years older than me but had never treated me like a kid, even when I’d been one. “What happened, Hudson? I was too far down the line to see.”It was pretty quiet with the field house clearing out, so I set my equipment bag across two benches. “I barely squeaked by to the finals.”She folded her arms and leaned against the wall, watching me disassemble my bow and pack up. “I heard you cracked under pressure. That’s why I’m not gloating about being ahead of you in points.”“Enjoy it while it lasts, Torres.” I bantered on autopilot because I was thinking about what Angela had said. Had I cracked? I knew that’d be the gossip. Some bloggers had been just waiting for it to happen. I’d been training intensely, and competition was brutal even without any family drama. But if I was going to lose it and start seeing things, why would it be something so random?“Are you going to tell me?” Angela prodded. “I promise not to tweet it.”That made one. It was a matter of record anyway. “I saw someone downrange, walking across the field.” I didn’t mention the weird clothes, which were the one thing that kept me from believing the whole thing had been some kind of optical illusion, like I’d seen someone on the sidelines out of the corner of my eye and just . . .

Editorial Reviews

"[A] clever girl-power take on the Robin Hood legend."-The Buffalo News"A rollicking time travel adventure that will sweep you away to the forest of Nottingham. Be prepared for surprises around every corner and a stubborn, strong-willed heroine you'll root for from the moment she picks up her bow!”-Colleen Houck, New York Times bestselling author of the Reawakened series and the Tiger’s Curse series"This cheeky take on the Robin Hood legend is pure fun. Connolly’s swashbuckling debut will satisfy any adventure fans."-Booklist"This fresh take on the Robin Hood mythology...is well worth it."-Publishers Weekly"Fans will enjoy Ellie’s escapades as she runs around Sherwood Forest, bumping into bad guys, and teens interested in historical fiction with a generous mix of action/adventure will appreciate this page-turner....[Hand to readers of] Renée Ahdieh’s The Wrath & the Dawn series, David Almond’s A Song for Ella Grey, and Scott Lynch’s The Lies of Locke Lamora."-SLJ"An appealing mix of tough and vulnerable...humor and complexity...make this absorbing time travel tale a refreshing change of pace."-Bulletin