Not If I See You First by Eric LindstromNot If I See You First by Eric Lindstrom

Not If I See You First

byEric Lindstrom

Hardcover | March 6, 2017

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In the tradition of novels of Gayle Forman and John Green comes this extraordinary YA debut about a blind teen girl navigating life and love in high school.
Parker Grant doesn't need 20/20 vision to see right through you. That's why she created the Rules: Don't treat her any differently just because she's blind, andnevertake advantage. There will be no second chances. Just ask Scott Kilpatrick, the boy who broke her heart.

When Scott suddenly reappears in her life after being gone for years, Parker knows there's only one way to react--shun him so hard it hurts. She has enough on her mind already, like trying out for the track team (that's right, her eyes don't work but her legs still do), doling out tough-love advice to her painfully naive classmates, and giving herself gold stars for every day she hasn't cried since her dad's death three months ago. But avoiding her past quickly proves impossible, and the more Parker learns about what really happened--both with Scott, and her dad--the more she starts to question if things are always as they seem. Maybe, just maybe, some Rules are meant to be broken.
Combining a fiercely engaging voice with true heart, debut author Eric Lindstrom'sNot If I See You Firstilluminates those blind spots that we all have in life, whether visually impaired or not.
Eric Lindstrom is a BAFTA and WGA-nominated veteran of the interactive entertainment industry.Not If I See You Firstis his debut novel. Eric invites you to find him online at ericlindstrombooks.com and on Twitter @Eric_Lindstrom.
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Title:Not If I See You FirstFormat:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 8.62 × 6 × 1.12 inPublished:March 6, 2017Publisher:Little, Brown Books for Young ReadersLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0316259853

ISBN - 13:9780316259859

Customer Reviews of Not If I See You First

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Disability Representation Actual Rating 3.5 Stars I don’t feel like I’ve read many books that feature Disability in KidLit, and none that I can remember that feature a blind protagonist and I really wanted to rectify that. Not If I See You First started off brilliantly. I instantly fell for Parker’s no-nonsense attitude, her strength in spite of her disability and her pure determination. I loved her friends Sarah, Faith and Molly and it was looking to be a REALLY GOOD BOOK. And then, somewhere in the middle, everything good I was feeling about this book just fell away. Let me explain in a more clear fashion. THINGS THAT COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER: 1. THE ROMANCE: I didn’t feel it. Best friends for four years and then they dated and then didn’t speak for TWO YEARS and it was all so FLAT where there should’ve been chemistry flying off the page. He watched over her, was always staring at her, he yearned for her all the time and never forgave himself for one simple mistake he made when he was thirteen and it was all a little unbelievable and strange. -- There was also this dialogue about “when the people who love you stare intensely at you all the time it’s okay because they mean well” and it was very creepy. -- Everything about their relationship was based on the past and that he was watching over her because her dad couldn’t and I didn’t like it because they BARELY INTERACTED AT ALL. Anyone who’s even been a teenager knows how you change from the ages of 13 to 16 and to Scott and Parker this didn’t matter at all. 2. LET’S JUMP TO CONCLUSIONS: Even though Parker learns this about herself at the very end of the book, this whole story is about how she jumps to conclusions about everything. She wears her disability like armour seven feet thick and YOU ONLY GET ONE CHANCE SO DON’T BLOW IT and it was strange. She had these unrealistic expectations of people she just met and well, it felt like a warped world view. People were trying to be nice to her and be her friend but she automatically assumed the worst in EVERYTHING and it was a little frustrating. Despite there being some not so good things, there were a lot of good things about this book: 1. THE FRIENDSHIP: The girls in this book and the friendship they shared was definitely a plus point for me. Molly, Sarah, Faith and Parker were exactly the kind of girl gang I love seeing in Young Adult books. They were strong individual characters who supported and protected each other. I especially loved how they helped Parker through schoolwork and social stuff that she couldn’t notice because of her disability and well, I LOVED THE SCENES WHEN THEY WERE TOGETHER. 2. DISABILITY PORTRAYAL: Even though Parker was a jump to conclusions sort of person, I did really like Parker. She was strong and very determined to not let her blindness hold her back. I am a little disappointed that only hearing was portrayed out of the senses that Parker had (and not smell and touch) but I loved the portrayal regardless. I loved how she was determined to run track, to be independent and to not be treated differently because of her lack of eyesight. I wish parts of this book had been better, but this was a book I would have read even if I knew about the things I didn’t like. I honestly wish we had more of Disability, and a loss of a sense organ in particular in books, because it’s very important to see diversity in literature. 3.5 stars.
Date published: 2017-08-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read «Rule #8: Don’t treat me like I’m stupid or a child. Blind doesn’t mean brain damaged.» I love that book. It managed to captivate me from the very first page. I loved the concept. I always wondered about the logistics of being blind and it was interesting to explore this world. I'm a fan of Parker, the main character. She is quick-witted and completely unafraid of making people uncomfortable. She refuses to fit into a box so that others will feel more comfortable with her blindness. And I loved the change that took lace over the course of the book, where she admitted to herself that maybe things weren't as clear cut as she had thought, and that perhaps there were many things which she was wrong about. «People don’t change. They just learn from experience and become better actors.» For me, the romantic part wasn't the main idea but still a big deal. The main thing is Parker's changed-life and it's built on running. It was such a good point. The characters were pretty convincing. As in so accurately selfish teenagers. I forgot that the author was a man, considering the main characters are mostly girls. It was well done. Page turning, captivating, and surprisingly a tale of redemption. I think at the core of this book it was to teach people that there are always different sides to a story. People don't always see things the way you do, so before judgement is rendered put yourself in their shoes. All pun intended. Open your eyes. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-07-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Loved it! I really enjoyed reading about a blind protagonist for a change! The detailed descriptions of how Parker navigates through life were so interesting and I especially liked learning about guide running. I’d almost like a sequel to this focused just on her running? I enjoyed it so much, I’m hoping there’s other books that feature it. Parker wears scarves over her eyes and there’s this one scene where a little boy thinks she’s pretending to be blind. Parker replies saying she’s blind not deaf, and explains why she wears them. “I wear it because it’s pretty. And because Japanese pilots in World War Two wore them when they crashed into things on purpose.” Sometimes I crash into things too, though not on purpose.” Grief is also a big theme of this book as Parker is still dealing with the loss of her Dad, who died three months ago. She also lost her Mom when she was seven, so she now lives with her Aunt, Uncle and cousins. "I’m glad for the good friends I have, but they can’t fill the space of a mom or dad who will always love me no matter what, and neither friends nor family can provide that special warmth I felt one time and somehow know, deep down, I’ll never feel again.” Also there’s strong female friendships in this book which is awesome. Parker is super sarcastic and usually doesn't let anything faze her, but when she finally breaks down and deals with her grief her friends are there to support her. I really enjoy reading books where I get to put myself in other peoples shoes and learn about experiences different than mine. I think it’s such a bonus to learn new things while doing something you enjoy (like reading!). This was one of those books and I’m looking forward to reading more with blind protagonists!
Date published: 2017-07-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Loved it! I really enjoyed reading about a blind protagonist for a change! The detailed descriptions of how Parker navigates through life were so interesting and I especially liked learning about guide running. I’d almost like a sequel to this focused just on her running? I enjoyed it so much, I’m hoping there’s other books that feature it. Parker wears scarves over her eyes and there’s this one scene where a little boy thinks she’s pretending to be blind. Parker replies saying she’s blind not deaf, and explains why she wears them. “I wear it because it’s pretty. And because Japanese pilots in World War Two wore them when they crashed into things on purpose.” Sometimes I crash into things too, though not on purpose.” I don’t necessarily like it when parents get upset at their kids for asking questions about things they’ve never seen before or don’t understand. Like couldn’t this have been learning experience instead? It reminded me of the scene in TFIOS when a little kid asked Hazel what her oxygen mask was for and the parent was embarrassed but Hazel was like "no its’s okay" and explained why. Grief is also a big theme of this book as Parker is still dealing with the loss of her Dad, who died three months ago. She also lost her Mom when she was seven, so she now lives with her Aunt, Uncle and cousins. "I’m glad for the good friends I have, but they can’t fill the space of a mom or dad who will always love me no matter what, and neither friends nor family can provide that special warmth I felt one time and somehow know, deep down, I’ll never feel again.” Also there’s strong female friendships in this book which is awesome. Parker is super sarcastic and usually doesn't let anything faze her, but when she finally breaks down and deals with her grief her friends are there to support her.
Date published: 2017-06-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Loved the story and main character Parker Grant has rules you best not break if you want to be in her life. Don’t treat her any differently just because she’s blind and never take advantage of her are two of the biggest ones. Scott Kilpatrick knows that from experience when he broke her heart. When two schools merge, Scott is suddenly back in Parker’s life, and there’s only one way for Parker to react – ignore him. She has enough going on in her life without adding Scott to the mix: trying out for the track team, if she can find a partner to run with, giving advice to her classmates on their love lives, and giving herself a gold star for every day she hasn’t cried since her father’s death three months ago. As Parker begins to learn more about the events that happened, both with Scott and with her father’s death, she starts to questions herself and her rule about not giving second chances. I hadn’t heard much about this book before received an arc of it, then it was the Uppercasebox book for December. I found myself really enjoying Parker’s voice and the humour laced throughout her thoughts and dialogue. I also really enjoyed the dynamics between the characters. Parker was an extremely independent girl with a strong voice that was a lot of fun to read. She had a fierceness about her that I really liked and she refused to let people treat her like a child or an invalid just because she was blind. She could still do things by herself so she was going to do those things. Her attitude did have some drawbacks as she wasn’t always completely open with people or with herself and she strong opinions could be oft-putting but it also made sense for her character. I enjoyed her growth as a character and that there were so many layers slowly being peeled away as the book went on. She was a complex characters whose bluntness had me both cringing and laughing. The relationships between the characters was one of my favourite things about this book. Her friendships with her longtime best friend Sarah was so perfect. They were a great contrast to each other and it was obvious why they were so close. Her new friendship with Molly added a new aspect to the story since the reader got to see someone learning the rules with them instead of all Parker’s friends knowing the rules already and being used to following them without thought. There was also the interesting dynamic between Parker and her aunt. Her aunt seemed to think she was being helpful by not letting Parker do a lot around the house or having different rules for Parker then her daughter but she was actually hindering Parker’s independence and taking away things that Parker enjoyed doing, like cooking supper. It was an adjustment that wasn’t easy for anyone when her aunt and her family moved into Parker’s house after her father’s death and it made for a lot of growth opportunity. The romance was kept light and I appreciated that. It let the main focus of the story be on Parker, her growth, and her struggles. I enjoyed the romance. It was sweet and there was a lot of conflict but also a lot of love between her and Scott. I liked that it took time for the whole story to come out about what had happened between Parker and Scott a few years ago and that we got to see both sides and feel the pain from both of them. The main story was Parker and I loved the focus on her. She had a lot of things to work through and there was a lot of taking a step forward only to stumble and need to take a step back. She was trying new things, like track and field, but she was also having trouble moving on, like not letting herself cry and grieve after her father. It was a good, interesting read. I can see why it was chosen as an Uppercasebox selection. *I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
Date published: 2016-02-13

Editorial Reviews

"Not If I See You First is thoughtful and honest, with characters that made me laugh, cry, and surprised me at every turn. It's a book I'll recommend for years to come."-Kody Keplinger, New York Times bestselling author of The DUFF and co-founder of Disability in KidLit