Notes from a Small Island

Paperback | March 12, 1998

byBill Bryson

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After nearly two decades in Britain, Bill Bryson made the decision to move back to the States for a while, to let his kids experience life in another country, to give his wife the chance to shop until 10 p.m. seven nights a week, and, most of all, because he had read that 3.7 million Americans believed that they had been abducted by aliens at one time or another, and it was thus clear to him that his people needed him.

But before leaving his much-loved home in North Yorkshire, Bryson insisted on taking one last trip around Britain, a sort of valedictory tour of the green and kindly island that had for so long been his home. His aim was to take stock of the nation’s public face and private parts (as it were), and to analyze what precisely it was he loved about a country that had produced Marmite, a military hero whose dying wish was to be kissed by a fellow named Hardy, place names like Farleigh Wallop, Titsey, and Shellow Bowells, people who said “Mustn’t grumble,” and shows like “Gardener’s Question Time.”

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From Our Editors

Arriving in England by ferry on a foggy night in March of 1973, Bill Bryson begins his tale about his adventures touring across the United Kingdom. Notes from a Small Island recounts with remarkable detail the hilarious personalities Bryson experiences on his travels. The Canadian bestseller, Notes From a Small Island is a hilarious co...

From the Publisher

After nearly two decades in Britain, Bill Bryson made the decision to move back to the States for a while, to let his kids experience life in another country, to give his wife the chance to shop until 10 p.m. seven nights a week, and, most of all, because he had read that 3.7 million Americans believed that they had been abducted by al...

From the Jacket

“Bill Bryson is a funny writer…doubled over belly shakes and seltzer through the nose funny.”— Globe and Mail“The year’s best travel book…funny and witty and truthful.”— Toronto Sun“The funniest book I read this year – winded by its humor, tears on the cheeks.”— Ottawa Citizen“Bryson is first and foremost a storyteller – and a supremel...

When The Lost Continent was published in 1989, Bill Bryson’s savagely funny account of his journey back to his roots in small-town U.S.A. took the reading public by a storm of guffaws. It was followed by Neither Here Nor There, in which Bryson applied his unique brand of wry humour to the foibles of Continental Europe and the Europeans...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 7.88 × 5.02 × 0.76 inPublished:March 12, 1998Publisher:McClelland & Stewart

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0771017049

ISBN - 13:9780771017049

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From Our Editors

Arriving in England by ferry on a foggy night in March of 1973, Bill Bryson begins his tale about his adventures touring across the United Kingdom. Notes from a Small Island recounts with remarkable detail the hilarious personalities Bryson experiences on his travels. The Canadian bestseller, Notes From a Small Island is a hilarious commentary of a North American in England.

Editorial Reviews

“Bill Bryson is a funny writer…doubled over belly shakes and seltzer through the nose funny.”— Globe and Mail“The year’s best travel book…funny and witty and truthful.”— Toronto Sun“The funniest book I read this year – winded by its humor, tears on the cheeks.”— Ottawa Citizen“Bryson is first and foremost a storyteller – and a supremely comic and original one at that.”— Winnipeg Free Press“A kind of Dave Barry-meets-Paul Theroux in a British commuter train.” — Sunday Express