Object Lessons In Elementary Science Volume 2; Following The Scheme Issued By The London School Board by Vincent Thomas MurchéObject Lessons In Elementary Science Volume 2; Following The Scheme Issued By The London School Board by Vincent Thomas Murché

Object Lessons In Elementary Science Volume 2; Following The Scheme Issued By The London School…

byVincent Thomas Murché

Paperback | February 13, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 Excerpt: ... Lead" the class to tell why we use paint, coal-tar, and other substances for covering woodwork; why, in fixing a wooden post in the ground, we always soak the lower end in tar, or stand it in pitch; why ships, boats, and barges are always kept well painted and tarred. Another enemy to timber is dry-rot. The simplest and best way of preventing this is to saturate the wood in oil Lesson XXVI TIMBEE--ITS USES I. Timber And Wood The trunks of all our trees yield wood. The only distinction between timber and wood is that the timber-trees are so large that their trunks may be sawn up into pieces not only long, but wide and thick as well. Such pieces of wood we call logs or balks of timber. They may be used in that state, or they may be sawn up into planks. In any case, by the term timber we mean great balks or planks of wood which, from their size and quality, are fit to be used in engineering and building. For all such purposes, strength and durability are, of course, the primary objects. Amongst the chief of these timber-trees are the ash, beech, cedar, elm, fir, hornbeam, larch, lime, mahogany, oak, poplar, teak, etc. The various ornamental woods used by the cabinetmaker form a class by themselves, and are not included under the head of timber. Among these are the ash, birch, box, cherry, ebony, maple, rose-wood, satin-wood, walnut, etc. II. Uses It is the special quality of each individual wood that renders it specially fitted for some particular kind of work. The woods may be classified in some such way as this:--1. Durable for dry carpentry.--The cedar, yellow deal, and poplar. 2. Durable for wet carpentry.--The alder, white cedar, and plane. 3. Elastic woods.--The ash, hazel, hickory, and yew. 4. Even grain.--The beech, lime, pear, and pine. 5. For ship-b...

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Title:Object Lessons In Elementary Science Volume 2; Following The Scheme Issued By The London School…Format:PaperbackDimensions:78 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.16 inPublished:February 13, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217734510

ISBN - 13:9780217734516

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