Occupational Stress And Organizational Effectiveness

Hardcover | June 1, 1987

EditorAnne W. Riley

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"This book is among the best on stress and its organizational consequences. It is based on papers presented at the Seventh Annual Applied Behavioral Science Symposium. The editors and most of the contributors are academic specialists on stress. The major theme of the book is that stress has negative, and sometimes positive, personal and organizational consequences. On the positive side, stress--perceived as challenge--may arouse performance-enhancing responses; but stress may also induce withdrawal, absenteeism, and poor performance. . . . An excellent preface and introductory chapter by the editors lay the groundwork for the essays that follow in this clearly written and perceptively argued anthology. The volume is valuable to practitioners and to students and teachers of industrial sociology or psychology as well as business administration." Choice

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"This book is among the best on stress and its organizational consequences. It is based on papers presented at the Seventh Annual Applied Behavioral Science Symposium. The editors and most of the contributors are academic specialists on stress. The major theme of the book is that stress has negative, and sometimes positive, personal an...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:287 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:June 1, 1987Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275922812

ISBN - 13:9780275922818

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?This book is among the best on stress and its organizational consequences. It is based on papers presented at the Seventh Annual Applied Behavioral Science Symposium. The editors and most of the contributors are academic specialists on stress. The major theme of the book is that stress has negative, and sometimes positive, personal and organizational consequences. On the positive side, stress--perceived as challenge--may arouse performance-enhancing responses; but stress may also induce withdrawal, absenteeism, and poor performance. The causes of stress lie at the individual level (people react differently), and in the demands of tasks, work group relations, and organizational features. However, employee assistance programs, the typical form of aid in dealing with employee stress, focus almost exclusively on the individual. Organizational causes are largely neither acknowledged by employers nor reflected in assistance programs. This is unfortunate in light of the increasing evidence that workplace characteristics (e.g., boring work, role ambiguity, hierarchical stifling of workers' views and initiative) are major cases of stress. An excellent preface and introductory chapter by the editors lay the groundwork for the essays that follow in this clearly written and perceptively argued anthology. The volume is valuable to practitioners and to students and teachers of industrial sociology or psychology as well as business administration.?-Choice