Of Forests and Clocks and Dreams: A literary and art collection by Takatsu

Of Forests and Clocks and Dreams: A literary and art collection

byTakatsu

Kobo ebook | May 28, 2016

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From the author of Espresso Love and Secondhand Memories, the award-winning trailblazer of online literature and transmedia storytelling, comes an unconventional postmodern collection of fragments, moments, imaginings containing thought-provoking and enigmatic short stories, poetry, essay, excerpts, aphorisms, photography, typography, design and artwork. His work paints surreal visions and explores philosophical themes of the human condition and spirituality, subjective perception and the nature of reality, the system and the cosmos through strange conversations, umbrellas, a talking bird, a girl with a top hat, grandfather clocks, transfigured stones, a missing archaeologist, bowls of rice, a man with twelve toes, and more.

The book features the award-winning transcendental "The Elephant Girl", a heartbreaking "Sometimes I Think You Can't Hear Me", the magical fable "By The River" and political essay "It's Pouring, Bring Two Umbrellas".

"[His stories] have a timeless quality, little legends or fables that enlighten or explain a philosophy of life, a zen moment... [they] touch on an innate mystery of things that allow one to see." - Patricia Keeney, York University Creative Writing Professor, Award-winning Poet, Critic and Author of One Man Dancing.

Title:Of Forests and Clocks and Dreams: A literary and art collectionFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:May 28, 2016Publisher:Inspiritus PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN:9990051830378

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing! I have been intrigued by S. Takatsu's work for a few years now, having followed his career ever since Secondhand Memories and through to Espresso Love. Perhaps what I found most intriguing about "Of Forests And Clocks And Dreams" besides the unorthodox style of blending artwork and photography with writing, is the way in which it flows. While the rhythm of the book is very dreamy and surreal--containing stories such as "The Boy And The Bird" which involves a parakeet speaking to its owner about philosophy--there's also an uncontrolled factor of chaos to it. Right from the beginning, you are swept into the author's inner world where you experience all the twists and turns his mind contains. You realize very quickly on that this isn't just your typical collection of short stories and poetry. Of course, the experimental formatting, artwork and photography easily gives away this impression from first leafing through the pages of the book, but when you actually sit down and begin to read the contents, you realize very quickly that what you are reading is more so the unconscious thoughts of the author as personified through his writing. Dealing with philosophy, metaphysics, spirituality, and the criticism of our capitalist system, the author manages to create the perfect blend of dealing with ideas such as: what is reality, what is the meaning of life, what is the soul, etc. without it coming off as being pretentious or too inaccessible. And while some readers may be turned off by some of the metaphysical ideas presented in this book, the author is able to reel in the reader into his visionary landscape without it being too overwhelming. The reader who may not agree with all of his thoughts, will at least find it interesting and will be entertained by the different ways in which the author goes about presenting his thoughts, rather that be through surreal short story, personal narrative, minimalistic poetry or short, yet powerful aphorism. The reader that finds themselves nodding their head in agreement, will definitely return time and time again to reread their favorite passages--either to interpret and gain more insight or to insure themselves that there is another that thinks as they do
Date published: 2016-06-02